Undergraduate Research Education Series

The Office of Undergraduate Research offers educational events on topics of interest to undergraduate student researchers and their faculty mentors. These events are open to all and are designed specifically with undergraduate students in mind.  

The Summer 2020 URES will be entirely virtual.  Full schedule available below and as a PDF FLIER HERE.

Zoom registration links will be updated as the semester goes on.  Recorded webinars will be posted after each live event.

Current UROP students are required to attend (register, login to, and participate in) 2 live events.

Please fill out the URES Evaluation Form to give feedback on each session you attend/watch.

Tuesday
May 19
11 - 12

Doing Library Research

Presented by Donna Ziegenfuss 

view a recording of this event >>

And use the following resources from the presentation as is helpful to you.  

presentation ppt >> 

presentation Handout >>

In this session, you will learn how to navigate the Marriott Library‚Äôs online resources and how to efficiently do library research.  You will be introduced to many library resources relevant to your individual field of research including field-specific journals and citation management tools.  This seminar is useful for students at any point in their project and can be revisited as online resources continue to develop.

Student feedback from this session:

"research can be really confusing but the speaker really helped give good tips to get started and resources to help down the road."

"It helped me with finding articles from google scholar to dissertations. (My articles only appeared in dissertation)"

"This session is very helpful for beginning research using the resources the library has. It also is good for continuing research and writing up own literature and comparing with other literature."

Wednesday
May 27
11 - 12

Responsible Conduct of Research

Presented by James Tabery

View a recording of this event >>

In this session, you will learn about some of the history of ethics in research and how to identify some common terms used in conversations about responsible conduct of research.  This session is useful to any student involved in research, as an introduction or a reminder about ethical conduct and debates in research.

Student feedback from this session:

"Anyone who is doing research involving human subjects should go to this event. The information was very valuable."

"looking at the IRB website, all of the information overwhelmed me. Now that I have attended this presentation, I feel much more confident to apply."

"I would recommend this URES session because it helped synthesize the research history that led to the formation of the IRB. It then explained the current policies in place to protect researchers and participants. Understanding the role of the IRB helped me feel prepared to engage in quality and ethical research."

Thursday
may 28
11:30 - 12:30

Microaggressions and Research

Presented by Ella Blanchard 

View a recording of this event >>

In this workshop style presentation, you will learn about what microaggressions are, a bit about how they impact folks, how to identify them when you or others are performing them, and how to deal with/respond to them.  This session is important for every student, as the content directly contributes to your overall working environment and helps develop an atmosphere of respect.

Student feedback from this session:

"We all come from places of privilege, and many things I learned helped me identify my own and other's microaggressions AND HOW TO DEAL WITH THEM, which is something super useful."

"This is an amazing opportunity to get everyone reflecting on their own bias in a welcoming and non-judgmental environment. Great for all researchers and all people in general. Thank you!"

"Speaker is very conscious of barriers to inclusivity and makes sure everyone can feel accepted at any level. Super well spoken and carefully checks privileges. She is real and straightforward. Awesome presentation."

thursday
June 4
2:30 - 3:30

Introduction to the Institutional Review Board (IRB)

Presented by Gary Henderson 

View a recording of this event >>

And use the following resources from the presentation as is helpful to you.

Presentation PPT >>

In this session, you will learn the basic history of the Institutional Review Board (IRB), what counts as Human Subjects research, and how and when you might need to use the IRB while doing research here at the U.  This session is good for anyone who is or is interested in doing research with Human Subjects at any stage of their research.

Student feedback from this session:

"Anyone who is doing research involving human subjects should go to this event. The information was very valuable."

"looking at the IRB website, all of the information overwhelmed me. Now that I have attended this presentation, I feel much more confident to apply."

"I would recommend this URES session because it helped synthesize the research history that led to the formation of the IRB. It then explained the current policies in place to protect researchers and participants. Understanding the role of the IRB helped me feel prepared to engage in quality and ethical research."

Tuesday
June 9
1 - 2

Data Management

Presented by Daureen Nesdill 

View a recording of this event >>

And use the following resources from the presentation as is helpful to you.

Presentation Handout >>

Effective data management is not intuitive.  In this session, you will learn about basic issues with data management (e.g. naming files, file storage, etc.) and you will be directed to useful data management resources.  As everyone who is doing research deals with some kind of data, this seminar is relevant to all researchers.

Student feedback from this session:

"It stressed the organization of file names/Data. This is a problem I have had already."

"The recommendations for data storage (file names, location, archiving, etc.) and the reasons behind them were new to me so I'll be changing how I do my work now."

"I think that this was important to know because when organizing data, if it is organized inefficiently, that can greatly negatively harm someone's research so to learn about it before we start managing data allows for organization."

Monday
June 15
9:30 - 10:30

How to Read a Research Article

Presented by Behrad Noudoost

View a recording of this event >>

And use the following resources from the presentation as is helpful to you.

presentation Handout >>

In this seminar you will learn about how to read a research article effectively. You will be given tips and strategies for how to read scholarly journal articles. This seminar in appropriate for any student who needs to read contemporary research in their field.

Student feedback from this session:

"It's important to understand between good and bad papers you can also understand what they want you to understand."

"It was very informative and relevant."

"It was extremely thorough. I think understanding how a paper is written was super interesting both for reading a paper and know how I'll write my own eventually."

Friday
June 26
12:30 - 1:30

Writing Abstracts

Presented by Nkenna Onwuzuruaha

View a recording of this event >>

And use the following resources from the presentation as is helpful to you.

PDF of presentation slides >>

Handout >>

In this session, you will learn about how to write an effective research abstract.  You will work on framing your research project concisely and accurately.  You will leave ready to write your research abstract.  This seminar is most useful for students currently needing to write an abstract.  It is also useful for students developing how to think about their project.

Student feedback from this session:

"A formulated pattern is given to help students compose their abstract efficiently."

"Abstracts are deceptively tricky to write, so I appreciate the help. I also really enjoyed the activity of analyzing abstracts in small groups. It was very productive to practice writing our own abstracts."

"Abstract writing can seem like a very daunting task but this URES session helped me narrow down components of an abstract. With those individual parts, it will help me approach writing one. I would recommend this to any research student."

Wednesday
July 8
10 - 11

Citation Management

Presented by Lorelei Rutledge & Erika Church

View a recording of this event >>

In this session, you will learn how to set up and use both EndNote and Zotero, commonly used citation management systems.  This session will be useful for any student needing an introduction to citation management systems to build their digital libraries (yes, now is a great time to start doing that!).

Student feedback from this session:

"Sometimes working on references is hard to keep track of so learning how to use different programs to keep everything organized is very helpful."

"I had no clue these things existed outside of what Word has. This will change my life! Also Very informative and versatile , very applicable."

"It was helpful not only for research but for daily university life when you are writing research papers for class. I liked seeing both examples w/ both Zotero & Endnote."

Tuesday
July 14
3:30 - 4:30

Images in Scientific Writing

Presented by David Belnap

View a recording of this event >>

And use the following resource if it is useful to you.

 Handout >>

In this session, you will learn how to create images and incorporate them into your writing.  You will also discuss the importance of accurate scientific communication.  Although this session focuses on a science field, the use of images is common throughout many fields and will benefit any student who will use images in their work.

Student feedback from this session:

"learning how to use images effectively in communicating scientific research. It was interesting to learn how images can accidentally be used as misleading or false data. It is important to know the pitfalls to avoid them when publishing images and to avoid misleading others with images."

"This session would be useful for all students in SURP/UROP/SPUR. The information presented in this session is very helpful for students actively involved in research as it'll assist in the method & publication of that research."

"The baseline question of 'what message do you want the reader to know/learn' is always worth exploring further. The value of integrity in the academic world is just as or more valuable."

Monday
July 27
3 - 4

Creating Effective Research Posters

Presented by Taylor Sparks 

zoom link and password

View previous version of this event here.

In this workshop, you will learn about the characteristics of effective research poster design and how to use some tools to use to prepare a research poster. This session covers the content and aesthetics of research posters. This seminar is most useful for students currently needing to create a research poster but is also helpful for students thinking about how to talk about their project. This session will also be useful for students who are ready to start creating images for their posters.

Resources for this session will be shared in a designated Box folder. Please check this folder before attending this session!

STUDENT FEEDBACK FROM THIS SESSION:

"More than just posters - more like 'presenting research effectively' I appreciated that it's early in the semester - good big picture stuff"

"This is my favorite session I have been to. He really helped us think about what to say at a conference when presenting a poster. I also really enjoyed the figures portion. I wouldn't have thought about that."

"This was the most useful URES I've been to. It had immediate practical application. And gave me new tools."

Tuesday
July 28
10 - 11

Contextualizing Your Research

Presented by Shane MacFarlan 

zoom link and password

In this session, you will work to identify several perspectives outside of the immediate perspective of the lab or project from which you can view your work, how your work fits in with those viewpoints, and how to explain those larger perspectives of your work to an audience (in a paper, presentation, or to a community member).

STUDENT FEEDBACK FROM THIS SESSION:

"Having an understanding of how your research relates and is connected to other people, the university and rest of the world can be difficult. This session helps to give some more perspective."

"Learning about how to communicate to others and putting your research in context is something I find to be really important as an undergraduate. Dr. Macfarlan did a great job explaining these concepts."

"Helped me understand that one has to balance personal interests with research. Importance of justifying research from small to broad context. Learning to see impact on world - don't be in small scale trap. Why to talk to so many people."