Summer Symposium

Oral 13: Oralia Aguilar, Jami Margaret Harvey – Oral Histories in the Era of COVID-19: The Utah Navajo and the Westside of Salt Lake City, Utah

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Faculty mentor: Mary Ann Villarreal
Oral Histories in the Era of COVID-19: The Utah Navajo and the Westside of Salt Lake City, Utah is about giving agency and voice to underrepresented communities and the individuals from these communities impacted by COVID-19. Our research consisted of recording and collecting the voices of the undocumented Latinx communities of the Westside of Salt Lake City, and the Utah Navajo communities of San Juan County.
Watch our research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact us at:
Oralia, aguilaroralia41@gmail.com
Jami, jami.margaret@gmail.com
View our Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster 49: Sahar Nikkhah – Joint spectral analysis of Crab Nebula with FERMI-VERITAS-HAWC data​

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Faculty mentor: Dave Kieda
Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) are deflected by Galactic magnetic field in their journey to earth. Hence, they no longer carry directional information. We study gamma-ray emission to indirectly probe CR origin. We have different gamma-ray instruments in the space and the ground to observe the emission at different energy bands. In this analysis, we study the spectral analysis of the Crab Nebula using the data collected by three different observatories
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: nikkhah.1@osu.edu


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Oral 12: Raquel Cifuentes – Gender Roles in Preschool Children’s Storytelling

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Faculty mentor: Cheryl Wright
The purpose of the research was to find patterns and themes in preschool children’s storytelling. Every child was able to make up a story, that they later on acted out in front of the class. Every story was coded to find any patterns that were gender related. The results were consistent with past research that indicated how young children did follow gender themes unconsciously in their storytelling.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: Raquelcifuentes12@gmail.com
View my presentation slides HERE 

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Poster 10: Emma Kerr – Optimization of magnetic coil geometries for coherent control of electron spin states in organic semi-conductor thin films under strong magnetic drive conditions

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Faculty mentor: Christoph Boehme
The purpose of this study is to optimize the geometry of a current-carrying structure that produces a homogenous oscillating magnetic field at radio-frequencies (1-200 MHz) with high amplitude B1. The circuit element should exhibit low impedance and allow for a straightforward application of the radiation field to organic semiconductor thin film devices for the purpose of studying spin-state transitions among pairs of electronic charge-carriers under strong magnetic drives.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: emkerr00@gmail.com

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Oral 9: Zachary Ta and Sarah Trela-Hoskins – Sleep Diet and Physical Activity in the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Faculty mentor: Kelly Baron
How has Covid-19 Impacted Utah citizens routines and habits? We are interested in gathering qualitative, relevant data and understanding the biggest lifestyle changes that we are facing today due to the Coronavirus Pandemic.
Watch our research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at:
Sarah, u1053722@umail.utah.edu
Zachary, u0847565@utah.edu
View our Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster 32: Chris Wallace-Carrete & Marilisa Vega – COVID-19 and the Staff Experience at the University of Utah

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Faculty mentor: Amy Bergerson
When COVID-19 forced the University to suspend all activity on campus, faculty, staff, and students had to adapt in the ways they interact and learn. This research focuses on how COVID-19 has affected University staff members and how staff members’ work has been impacted by COVID-19 related changes. Through our research, we have identified four salient themes that encompass the concerns of University staff members and we provide recommendations on how to address those concerns.
Click below to hear us present our poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at:
Christopher, christopher.wallacecarrete@utah.edu
Marilisa, u1031735@utah.edu
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Poster 11: Ayesha Khan – Developing an AI Warning System for Infectious Respiratory Disease Outbreaks

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Faculty mentor: Tolga Tasdizen
COVID-19 presents itself in regions of the lungs which are filled with fluid instead of air. This is a phenomenon seen in other respiratory diseases, but COVID-19 is unique in that it is present in these regions of the lungs with no known specific pattern or distribution. The aim of this project is to create an AI system that recognizes abnormalities in chest x-rays and present a warning when similar cases are recognized. This allows the opportunity to contain the spread in a population.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0583914@utah.edu
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Poster 42: Nathan Foulk – Interaction corrections for 2D scattering from a hard disk

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Faculty mentor: Mikhail Raikh
It is known that the presence of the Fermi sea modifies the scattering of an electron from a point-like impurity. This is due to the Friedel oscillations of the electron density around the impurity. These oscillations create an additional scattering potential for incident electrons. The closer the energy of the incident electron to the Fermi level, the stronger the additional scattering. We study this effect for the case when the impurity is not point-like but rather a hard disk.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: natefoulk4@gmail.com
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Poster 17: Milan Oxspring – Responding to COVID-19 in Higher Education: Lessons Learned From the 2008 Financial Crisis

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Faculty mentor: Ruth Watkins, Laura Snow, Mike Martineau
In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, leaders in higher education are busy developing strategic plans to guide their institutions through economic turmoil. One approach to finding a blueprint for success is through analysis of university advancement in the decade following the 2008 financial crisis. This project seeks to learn which of the largest public American universities saw the greatest growth and prosperity from 2008-2018 and what factors fostered this success.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: mboxspring@gmail.com

 

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Poster 13: Somi Lee – Psychological Impact of Social Isolation in Older Adults during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Faculty mentor: Joseph Kim
The COVID19 pandemic has brought numerous changes to our lives. In the U.S., many people have been encouraged or even enforced at one point to socially distance themselves and stay-at-home. While social distancing can help prevent the spread of the disease, limited social activity can negatively affect one’s emotional well-being, especially for older adults whose social contacts are often outside the home. The goal of our study is to find out how social isolation impacts one’s mental health.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: somi.lee@utah.edu
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Poster 19: Nathan Pfau – Psychological Impact of Social Isolation during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Faculty mentor: Joseph Kim
COVID-19 has spread at a high rate through the United State and because of this social isolation/distancing has been encouraged or even enforced in some areas. Every little is know about how social isolation can affect the mental health of older people and especially during a pandemic. This study aims to focus on the effect of social isolation on the mental health of older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1044563@utah.edu


 
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Poster 24: Brett Smith – Domestic Violence in the Age of COVID-19

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Faculty mentor: Sonia Salari
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues there are worldwide concerns about domestic violence victims being ordered to stay at home with their abusers. This study is attempting to understand the impact of COVID-19 on domestic violence in Utah. On March 6 Governor Gary Herbert declared a state of emergency in Utah. On March 12 Utah schools were dismissed and remained so through the end of the school year. What impact has this had on the number of child abuse cases and domestic violence in general?
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0966829@utah.edu
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Oral 5: Isaac Martin – The number of torsion divisors in a strongly F-regular ring is bounded by the reciprocal of F-signature

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Faculty mentor: Karl Schwede
Earlier in 2020, Polstra showed that the cardinality of the torsion subgroupof the divisor class group of a local stronglyF-regular ring is finite. We expand upon thisresult and prove that the reciprocal of theF-signature of a local stronglyF-regular ringRbounds the cardinality of the torsion subgroup of the divisor class group ofR, and provide a necessary and sufficient condition for equality.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: isaac.act.martin@gmail.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster 15: Allison McElroy – Understanding Demographic Characteristics of COVID-19 in Utah using a Network Modeling Approach

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Faculty mentor: Lindsay Keegan
I investigated the use of network models as a way to explain the disparity of positive COVID-19 cases in different racial/ethnic demographics in utah. My hypothesis is that greater connectivity between individuals deemed essential would be greater, explaining some of the differences in case counts.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: allison.mcelroy105@gmail.com
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Poster 8: Kameron Goold – Using Elemental Abundances to Explore the Star Formation History of the Milky Way

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Faculty mentor: Gail Zasowski
We focus here on efforts to empirically measure the relationship between the chemical abundance ratios of magnesium-to-iron (written [Mg/Fe]) and iron-to-hydrogen (written [Fe/H]). The distribution of this relationship in chemical space is representative of progressive star formation in the Milky Way. We parameterize this distribution by measuring the slope of its morphology in order to explore the star formation history of the Milky Way Galaxy.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: Kameron.Goold@utah.edu
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Oral 1: Dallen Calder – Lessons Learned from COVID-19 to Enhance Research Administration Services.

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Faculty mentor: Andy Weyrich
Covid-19 shutdowns began in mid-march of this year. This project is focused on analyzing the work-from-home productivity levels when compared to pre-Covid metrics. The ability of the office of the Vice President for Research to telecommute and maintain levels of productivity were also assessed. Based high telecommute feasibility and employee work-from-home preference a hybrid work model may be recommended for the future.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1039580@utah.edu
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster 9: Jerry Howard – Drying and sintering of easily sterilizable and reusable xerogel filters for N95 respirators

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Faculty mentor: Krista Carlson
We wanted to make reusable filters for N95 masks. We proposed to make them from xerogel, as this is a porous material which can be autoclaved for sterilization. Xerogel is the result of making a sol-gel and drying it at ambient pressure. Making a piece of xerogel large enough to be used as a filter without cracking is difficult. We investigated the effects of diameter on drying time of xerogels. Xerogels with larger diameter showed a longer drying time.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: jrhow2@gmail.com
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Poster 4: Rebecca Bateman – JASC or mask: could SARS-CoV-2 become “just another seasonal coronavirus”?

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Faculty mentor: Frederick Adler
This research uses mathematical modeling to determine the conditions under which SARS-CoV-2 may become more like a seasonal coronavirus in terms of virulence, immunity, and long term spread.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: rebecca.bateman.uou@gmail.com
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Poster 23: Jacob Scutt – Experimental Study on the Parametric Acoustic Array and its Applications

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Faculty mentor: Pai Wang
This project aims to understand and consider applications for a new speaker technology which has very high directivity – like a flashlight but with sound.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: jacob.scutt@utah.edu

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Poster 2: Jacob Baldauf – Enhancing Transmission Models of Covid-19 with Genomic Data

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Faculty mentor: Lindsay Keegan
Phylogenetic trees are one of many tools used to understand a virus’s evolution. Phylogenetic trees allow researchers to understand how the virus spread from one population to another. Using covid-19 RNA sequences, researchers have created the evolutionary tree of covid-19. We created a dynamic simulation study to model the covid-19 pandemic. Using this simulation, we will investigate what information can be learned from phylogenetic trees regarding virus transmission.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: jake.baldauf2@gmail.com
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Poster 22: Luis Rufino – Investigating supersymmetric dark matter with MADHAT

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Faculty mentor: Pearl Sandick
  In this research project I explain what dark matter is and how the Minimal supersymmetric standard model has the possibility of explaining this phenomenon. I go over the theory along with how to detect these supersymmetric dark matter particles.
  Using a program called MADHAT allows me to place cross-section limits on supersymmetric dark matter models, and compare the cross-section with the Fermi-LAT satellite. Furthermore, determining if the dark matter models are excluded.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: luisrufino24@gmail.com

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Poster 37: Bridget Dorsey -Audiogram Interpretation As A Diagnostic Indicator Of Congenital Cytomegalovirus

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Faculty mentor: Albert Park
Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) is a significant cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in children. This study asks, are there audiometric measures that are characteristic of cCMV and could be used to distinguish cCMV from other nonsyndromic causes of SNHL? Preliminary results suggest that cCMV infected children present with a larger difference in hearing loss between the better and worse hearing ears when compared to children with SNHL caused by Large Vestibular Aqueduct (LVA).
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: bridget.dorsey@utah.edu

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Poster 47: Abel Shiferaw – Long-Lived Particle searches at the Large Hadron Collider

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Faculty mentor: Yue Zhao
The existence of Long-Lived Particles (LLPs) is highly motivated in Hidden Valley (HV) models. MATHUSLA is a newly proposed detector that is designed to be sensitive to LLP signatures. We use PYTHIA, a programming language, to generate a high-energy collison event at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to study the decay of a HV pion into dimuon pairs. We are interested in estimating the sensitivity of MATHUSLA to HV signatures.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: ashiferaw6@gatech.edu
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Poster 26: Kincade Stevenson – Modeling and Docking Potential eIF4A Inhibitors

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Faculty mentor: Jon Rainier
I modeled 3D structures and computationally docked them to the eIF4A protein to find which types of small molecules could be potential targets for eIF4A protein inhibtion.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1095368@utah.edu
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Poster 45: Matthew Mikota – Workplace Climate for LGBT+ Physicists: A Predictor of Outness

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Faculty mentor: Ramón Barthelemy
We analyzed the climate experiences of LGBT+ physicists through an online survey (N=324) collected by the committee on LGBT+ physicists for the American Physical Society. We found that being a student, exposure to exclusionary behavior, and both positive and negative workplace climate were significant predictors of outness to coworkers. The results indicate a positive workplace climate is a strong predictor of outness suggesting the importance of proactively inclusive physics communities.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: mjmikota@gmail.com

 

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Poster 3: Alex Ballinger – Communicating Research Information and Activities Through Digital Media

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Faculty mentor: Diane Pataki
Research with University of Utah College deans and researchers to create an effective way of communicating on digital media.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: lexballinger@gmail.com
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Oral 7: Kylie Persson – High-Throughput Production of Platelet-Like Particles

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Faculty mentor: Tara Deans
This project focuses on a novel method for producing platelet-like particles in vitro using the MEG-01 cell line. Matured and differentiated MEG-01 cells were infused through a microfluidic system and platelet-like particles were produced. We conclude that our microfluidic system produces viable platelet-like particles from MEG-01 cells and that PMA enhances CD41a expression of the particles.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0994707@utah.edu
**This presentation will only be available on July 30th for the duration of the virtual summer symposium. If you would like access to the presentation after this date, please email tara.deans@utah.edu for more information**
 
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Oral 2: Nima Fatahian – Defining The Role of Chaperone Mediated Autophagy in Cardiac Pathology

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Faculty mentor: Rajeshwary Ghosh
Protein degradation pathways are essential for maintaining protein homeostasis and thus normal cellular function. Chaperone Mediated Autophagy (CMA) is a novel protein degradation pathway that selectively degrades cytosolic and misfolded proteins containing a unique KFERQ-like motif. CRY-AB R120G has shown to accumulate in the heart and cause desmin-related cardiomyopathy. Our goal was to test if activating CMA can selectively deplete Cry-AB R120G before it accumulates and causes disease.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1000319@utah.edu
View my Presentation Slides HERE

 
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Poster 16: Ashley Merrell – Investigating the Impact of COVID-19 and Social/Political Activism on College of Science Students

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Faculty mentor: Jordan Gerton
In the chaos of today’s world, we were curious to see how COVID-19 and recent social and political events/activism are affecting how students view and manage their education. While we have begun analyzing the quantitative data received, this is merely the beginning of understanding the survey responses from each individual. We will continue to move forward by looking at the qualitative responses focusing on ideas of how to solve the issues that we have begun to see so far in our investigation.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: ashleybmerrell@yahoo.com
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Poster 25: Maia Southwick and Tracy Phan – Mental Health Among College Freshmen Displaced By COVID-19

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Faculty mentor: Monisha Pasupathi
Freshman year of college is an important time for identity development and achieving autonomy. University closures due to COVID-19 has led to college freshmen being abruptly sent back home, or displaced. Disruptions to this formative year may have significant effects on freshmen well-being and mental health. This research project sought to answer whether mental health concerns are more elevated than normal among freshmen displaced due to COVID-19.
Click below to hear us present our poster!
Questions or comments? Contact us at:
Maia, maia.southwick@utah.edu
Tracy, tracy.phan@utah.edu
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Poster 34: Liam Clancy – An Analysis of Cross-Cutting Concepts in a Claims-Evidence-Reasoning Focused Physics Course

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Faculty mentor: Lauren Barth-Cohen
Cross Cutting Concepts (CCCs) `help provide students with an organizational framework for connecting knowledge from the various disciplines into a coherent and scientifically based view of the world.’ My research investigated their use in an introductory physics lab class. I both critically analyzed the labs for their connection to the 3 point framework, and did coding analysis on student responses. In conclusion I argue that CCCs should be reclassified into primary and secondary concepts.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: lclancy@highpoint.edu

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Poster 6: Rachel D’Agostini – Synthesis of Easily Sterilizable and Reusable Xerogel Filters for N95 Respirators

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Faculty mentor: Krista Carlson
Single-Use N95 masks are being produced every day but can not keep up with the current demand. This project focuses on the synthesis of xerogels and understanding the interactions between the functional groups of our chemicals and porogen.This understanding will help us analyze the microstructures of xerogels and create a filter for N95 masks.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: U1120909@utah.edu
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Poster 35: Revi Brown – Assessing Autophagic Flux in Primary Arterial Endothelial Cells From Humans

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Faculty mentor: John David Symons
Our research focuses on the intracellular protein quality control pathway macroautophagy in primary arterial endothelial cells from patients with and without cardiovascular disease. Cells are collected from the sheath that is otherwise discarded during an arterial catheterization procedure. Endothelial cells then are identified via immunofluorescent staining, followed by treatment with pharmacological agents that allow the process of autophagy to be evaluated.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: rrbrown@wesleyan.edu
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Poster 40: Danielle Brown – Validation of Matched Run Method for Extended Gamma-Ray Sources

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Faculty mentor: Binita Hona
Extended gamma-ray sources that span the fields of view of gamma-ray instruments prevent them from ‘seeing’ the cosmic ray background near the source. This complicates the estimation of background radiation, which is needed for the analysis of source data. A new method of background estimation – the Matched Run Method – is required to enable analysis of extended sources using telescopes with small fields of view, such as the VERITAS instrument. My research consists of validating this method.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1091342@utah.edu


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Oral 10: Eliza McKinney – The Living Tomb: Victorian Discourse about Female Seclusion in the Orient

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Faculty mentor: Nadja Durbach
This project analyzes the language of Victorian, British women’s writing about female seclusion in India, namely the use of the terms zenana, purdah, and harem, and the surrounding rhetoric regarding these terms.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: elizathebrute@gmail.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE

 
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Poster 1: Seth Ack – Diagnostic Capabilities of Nucleic Acid Amplification Testing for COVID-19

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Faculty mentor: Lars Laurentius
In this project, we focused on reviewing the current testing methods for diagnosing COVID-19 in patients that have been exposed to SARS-CoV-2 . My role as part of this project was to examine the current capabilities and limitations of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) in detecting the presences of SARS-CoV-2 RNA. This was accomplished through an extensive literature analysis evaluating the effect of sample type, timing of sample collection, and type of NAAT used.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: sack@pugetsound.edu
 
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Oral 3: Matthew Findlay – REMEDI-COVID19

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Faculty mentor: Kevin Shah
As COVID-19 spreads across the world, it has become apparent the virus has the alarming capacity to damage cardiovascular health. It appears that this damage is caused by excessive inflammatory molecules that can flood the body when a patient has a severe infection with COVID-19. Thus, by analyzing specific biomarkers of inflammation, it is hoped that physicians will be able to predict when a patient battling COVID-19 is at risk for suffering adverse cardiovascular events.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: mattcfindlay@gmail.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE 

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Poster 5: Tayla Chiang – Multiplexed Detection of COVID-19/SARS-CoV-2 Biomarkers for Diagnosis

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Faculty mentor: Lars Laurentius
This project involved an extensive study of the current literature for COVID-19 diagnostic tests to better understand the testing criteria and their effectiveness. The focus is on laboratory and point-of-care based serological tests to identify SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals. These tests detect antibodies in blood produced by the immune system to fight the virus. Results from samples obtained at different times post infection onset and different types of serological test will be discussed.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: tayla.chiang@utah.edu
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Poster 44: Emily Martin – Identifying the Structure of the Zeaxanthin/GSTP1 Complex

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Faculty mentor: Martin Horvath
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in wealthier nations and there is currently no way to slow or stop the progression of the disease. Xanthophylls help protect the macula from oxidative light damage, but we don’t know much about how they interact with binding proteins. I used the molecular docking program AutoDock Vina to come up with likely solutions to the structure of the GSTP1/Zeaxanthin complex.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: emily.martin2020@gmail.com
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Poster 46: Sonia Sehgal – Finding the Role of Biological Probes in MUTYH

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Faculty mentor: Martin Horvath
In this project, MUTYH will be studied through computational modeling and an activity assay to find biological probes that can bind to the protein and affect its function. Currently, the role of Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway in cancer is still unclear, making it challenging to find therapeutic interventions. These probes can later be tested in animal models and may serve as the foundation for anticancer drug discovery.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: soniasehgal499@gmail.com

 

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