2022 URS

Poster #26: Suhyun Hahm – Chronic stressors of varying properties induce differences in the modulation of behavior and biology

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Faculty mentor: Moriel Zelikowsky and Micheal Conoscenti
Chronic stress induces enduring behavioral and biological changes. Chronic stressors are not identical and have varying properties such as intensity, duration, and quality. Chronic social isolation stress (SIS) and chronic foot shock (FS) differ from one another in that SIS presents a continuous stress whereas FS dispenses a series of acute stressors. Chronic stressors of varying properties induce differences in the modulation of behavior and biology, suggesting that the neural pathways underlying these behavioral variations may differ. Since we are constantly subjected to various types and levels of chronic stress throughout our lifetime, examining their differentiation and significance is valuable.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: hahmsuhyun@gmail.com
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Poster #22: Cindie Lee – Structured versus Non-structured Days: Physical Activity Among Adolescents during COVID-19

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Faculty mentor: Yang Bai
The purpose of this study was to examine the physical activity levels differences in children and adolescents between structured days vs non-structured days in school.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1107952@utah.edu
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Oral #10: Shiyu Wang – Limited Shoulder Range of Motion and Trunk Compensatory Movements

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Faculty mentor: Julia Dunn
In the United States, there are roughly 1.7 million people who have lost a limb. Though the majority of patients have lost their lower limb, approximately 50,000 patients have upper limb loss (Cordella 2016). Transhumeral amputations, amputations along the length of the humerus, can be more limiting than more distal amputations because fewer joints are preserved. In addition, the shape and form of conventional socket suspension systems interfere with shoulder range of motion, further limiting arm movement and articulation. Limiting shoulder range of motion may lead to compensatory motion at other joints when completing activities of daily living, resulting in additional energy expenditure and potential risk of injury due to overuse and fatigue. These compensatory movements may lead to pain and additional health problems which ultimately decrease the quality of life of patients with upper limb loss (Webster 2021).  
Therefore, the primary objective with this project is to study individuals with transhumeral limb loss and quantify the relationship between shoulder range of motion and compensatory movements in the trunk and neck.  We hypothesize that if shoulder range of motion is limited, then there will be a higher degree of movement in the trunk and neck when compared to individuals without limited shoulder range of motion. Successfully quantifying this relationship will inform future research focused on improving quality of life for patients using upper limb prosthetics and novel devices such as osseointegrated (OI) endoprosthetic docking systems (Zaid 2019).  
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1251695@umail.utah.edu
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster #31: Annette Ellis – Race in Clinical Research

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Faculty mentor: Sara Simonsen
Looking into how policies of clinical research exclude people of color, using Dr. Simonsen’s engagement session to highlight examples of how people of color are not the majority in clinical research, and discuss whiteness as a whole.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: annettedellis@gmail.com
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Oral #14: Victoria Ding – Investigating Methylated DNA Recognition by the N-terminal Zinc Fingers of ZBTB38

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Faculty mentor: Bethany Buck-Koehntop
I am investigating how the N-terminal zinc fingers of ZBTB38 recognize their methylated consensus sequence.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1020647@utah.edu
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster #3: Sanila Math – The Hypervisibility/Invisibility Paradox of the South Asian Community and the Impact of Colorism on South Asian Health in the United States

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Faculty mentor: Edmund Fong
This paper synthesizes the current literature on the hypervisibility of South Asian doctors and the invisibility of South Asian patients and establishes colorism as an undertheorized mechanism of healthcare disparities. South Asian is defined as indi­vid­u­als with ances­try from Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pak­istan, Sri Lan­ka, and the Mal­dives. Contributing to an evidence base rooted in experiences of historically excluded populations can improve culturally sensitive care.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: sanilamath@gmail.com

Link to YouTube Video: https://youtu.be/EcpjXjADd0c
 
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Poster #50: Shaylie Platten – Neither worry nor cognitive load affects how our brains process errors

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Faculty mentor: Sara LoTemplio
The goal of our research is to add to the literature of ERN studies by examining the effects of working memory load, anxiety, and Event-Related Negativity. We found that there was no negligible difference between those who had the worry condition and those who had the positive condition.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1182632@umail.utah.edu
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Oral #13: Katerina Excell – The role of Amyloid Precursor Protein in a model of Alzheimer’s Disease

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Faculty mentor: Villu Maricq
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating disorder that leads to deterioration of cognition and memory. The prevalence of AD rises with age, and is also greater in individuals with trisomy 21. We have modeled the overexpression of APP in transgenic C. elegans to gain new insights into the pathophysiology of AD. We found that motor-mediated transport of AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate-gated currents were severely disrupted, leading to altered behavior of the animals.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1195036@utah.edu
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster #42: Jessica Cuello – Exploring Food Justice through Qualitative Research

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Faculty mentor: Adrienne Cachelin
The objective of this collaborative multiyear research project is to understand how the University can best partner with community farmers, public health organizations, and agencies to build a just and resilient local food system. 
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1312134@utah.edu


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Poster #2: Holden Jones – Attitudes Towards Gender in Future Health Care Providers

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Faculty mentor: Claudia Geist
There is a growing literature on the challenges faced by sexual minorities, but even more so by
gender minorities in the US health care system. I will be researching current attitudes towards Gender amongst undergraduate students. Does Gender affect the way you treat a patient? Would you correct peers who misgender or use Gender Exclusive language? These are a few of the many questions asked in order to determine the current education that is needed to provide gender-inclusive care.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1040420@umail.utah.edu
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Poster #30: Annie Matzke – The Depositional History of the Bonneville Salt Flats from the Geochemical Analysis of Ostracodes

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Faculty mentor: Brenda Bowen
During my undergraduate research I spent time working with Jeremiah Bernau studying the Bonneville Salt Flats. We took samples from two cores from the salt flats and then took individual samples every ten cm. These samples were then processed and cleaned so that they could be sent out for carbon 14 dating and Strontium analysis. This information helped explained the depositional environment of the Salt Flats by giving us the age and the water source.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: anniematzke@gmail.com
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Poster #15: Gabriel Santana – Data augmentation of electromyography data to improve machine-learning performance

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Faculty mentor: Caleb Thomson
In this study, we aim to improve the performance and reduce the data collection of popular machine-learning algorithms for decoding motor intent from electromyography (EMG) data through data augmentation. Data augmentation can include adding noise and dropping out data. We found that augmenting EMG data with gaussian noise did not produce statistically significant results in improving performance. Future work will explore additional data augmentation techniques that may improve performance.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: gabriel.santana@utah.edu
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Poster #34: Sameer Khan – Exploration of Dusty Debris at the L1 Lagrange Point of the Earth-Sun System

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Faculty mentor: Ben Bromley
The goal of this project is to assess the efficacy of a potential remedy to climate change, where a cloud of dusty debris centered around the L1 Lagrange point acts as a sunshade. To accomplish this, a python script was created to numerically integrate the positions of bodies in the solar system and to find an ideal starting point for the L1 Lagrange point.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: khan.sameerh2002@gmail.com


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Oral #2: Tessa Vu – Spatial Investigation of Toxic Sites and Water—A Focus on Racial Equity

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Faculty mentor: E-Sok Andy Hong
This research focuses on Utah within Salt Lake county’s toxic sites, which are a point source of pollution, in order to investigate and provide further understanding of their correlations with marginalized populations as well as water bodies. This means there are important implications for Salt Lake’s future health, and minorities tend to be the canary in the coal mine—these affected populations present an opportunity to investigate and mitigate environmental hazards.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: tessavu@outlook.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster #41: Joshua Christensen – The LDS Context: Religious Trauma, Social Safety, and LGBTQ+ Health

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Faculty mentor: Lisa Diamond
This project attempted to explore how potentially harmful beliefs, teachings, and messages given by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints affect members of the LGBTQ+ community who are or were members of the LDS church. Prior research on the intersection between religious and LGBTQ+ identities has suggested that participation within unsupportive religions—including the LDS church—can contribute to negative mental health outcomes, and this study intended to not only investigate whether
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1256132@utah.edu
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Poster #40: Ali Bergmark – An Analysis of the Effects of Background Noise and Supportive Context on Speech Recognition Memory in Older Adults

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Faculty mentor: Brennan Payne
Exploration of the relationship between supportive linguistic context, background noise, and sentence recognition in older adults. All results are preliminary.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1262850@utah.edu


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Oral #17: Alexander Becraft – Well-being Elevated/WeBeWell: Mental Health Prevention and Promotion:Leveraging positive psychological interventions and social entrepreneurship to build resilience and well-being in college students

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Faculty mentor: Marissa Diener
In this study we evaluated the impact of a six-week well-being program developed by Webewell, on components of mental health. WeBeWell delivers evidence-based skill lessons from positive and clinical psychology, created by Drs Ed and Carol Diener, and others developed by the Webewell team. We deliver this curriculum through app and web technology and meet in zoom-based peer support group settings to discuss our well-being concepts, reinforce our curriculum, and facilitate connection.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: becrafto@gmail.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster #45: Mickenzie Fleming – Evaluating the Efficacy of Asynchronous and Synchronous Problem-Solving Teleconsultation with Teachers who Serve Rural Students with Disabilities

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Faculty mentor: Aaron Fischer
A brief introduction of this study begins with special education services are available to help children who are classified with disabilities that include austim, intellectual disability, and developmental disabilities. The purpose and goals of this study is to give guidance and feedback to the educators who have students with disabilities using teleconsultation procedures but specifically using synchronous and asynchronous techniques.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0894477@umail.utah.edu
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Oral #8: Jeff Perry – A Residual Stress Analysis of Two-Photon Polymerized Thin Film

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Faculty mentor: Roseanne Warren
Thin films have a variety of significant uses in many industries, some of which include semiconductors, optical coatings, light emitting diodes, medical devices, and others. Residual stress exists in many thin-film coatings and can lead to peeling, blistering, cracking, or buckling of the film post-deposition. The objective of this research is to perform the first measurements of residual stress in two-photon polymerized films and correlate these stresses with the polymerization conditions.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0871655@umail.utah.edu
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Oral #7: Ian Lavin – Online learning with Spiking Neural Networks for Data Prefetching

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Faculty mentor: Rajeev Balasubramonian
Our research is focused on utilizing Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs) for data prefetching on the CPU.
SNNs apply Hebbian Learning to neuron communication, utilizing a unique algorithm for weight adjustment. When compared to Artificial Neural Networks, these differences come with their own set of strengths that we want to leverage to design an improved data prefetcher.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1206789@utah.edu
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster #8: Mary Smith – The Effects of Mathematics Education in Indian Boarding Schools, 1950-1970

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Faculty mentor: Cynthia Benally
Indian boarding schools, like much of U.S. Indigenous history, is an overlooked past that continues to affect tribal communities and its people. Indian boarding schools were created for Indigenous students to attend, so they could be trained and assimilated to work in white American society. However, they were not given a proper education. The instruction at these schools was inadequate and did not prepare students so that they could succeed in life. This project focuses on their math education.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1263836@utah.edu
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Poster #7: Summer Furrer – Cellular and Subcellular Localization Patterns of Hepatitis Delta Virus in Sjogren’s Syndrome Salivary Gland Tissue

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Faculty mentor: Melodie Weller
Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) was found in the salivary gland of Sjogren’s syndrome (pSS) patients. Sjogren’s syndrome, an autoimmune disease, causes fatigue, low saliva production, autoantibody production, and salivary gland inflammation. This study was designed to determine the localization patterns of HDV in pSS salivary gland, in hopes of furthering the understanding of theHDV mechanism in pSS and the etiology of this disease.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1245821@utah.edu

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Poster #51: Lauren Thurgood – Psychological Distress of Transgender and Gender Diverse Populations: The Role of Proximal Gender Minority Stressors and Rumination

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Faculty mentor: Lisa Diamond
The present study examines the role of gender minority stressors (negative expectations, internalized transphobia, and nondisclosure) on the psychological distress of transgender and gender diverse via the mediator of rumination. Measured are the outcome variables of depression, social anxiety, and perceived stress. Results supported a mediation model (both full and partial) of rumination as a predictor of psychological distress in the presence of gender minority stressors.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: laurenjthurgood@gmail.com
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Oral #16: Nathaniel Thomas – IFITM3, SAMHD1, and the IFN Response to Viruses

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Faculty mentor: Naina Phadnis
This project was focused on HIV-1 and attempting to learn more about the “bystander effect”. The Planelles Lab recently answered the question of whether a secondary infection of HIV-1 results in a protective bystander effect. Working with the Planelles Lab, this project delved deeper to try and answer what causes the bystander effect to occur.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: nathaniel_thomas@outlook.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE 

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Oral #9: Koriann South – Teaching Ethics in AI

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Faculty mentor: Eliane Wiese
To teach students to consider ethics across the computer science curriculum, we need assignments that require the application of ethics at all levels of technical implementation. Creating such assignments is not straightforward. My thesis presents a process for creating ethics-integrated assignments for an AI class. Think-alouds with these assignments showed how ethics-integrated assignments can help and hinder student learning.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1116021@utah.edu
View my Presentation Slides HERE 

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Poster #14: BENSON PULVER – Baseline for Magnetically Propelled Soft Robots

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Faculty mentor: Yong Lin Kong
We are testing how changing the parameters of a magnetically propelled silicone robot affects its performance for medical applications
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: benson.pulver@gmail.com

 

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Poster #49: Sophia Martinez – Narrative Agency and Distress Regulation in Youth

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Faculty mentor: Monisha Pasupathi
The objective of this study was to test whether narrative agency, as manifested in the autobiographical narratives of children between 8 and 17 yrs. old, is associated with their ability to cope with distressing memories, as reflected by reductions in distress.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: sophiamartinezsc@gmail.com

 

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Poster #12: Angelica Madsen – Hydrogel-Based Dehydration Sensor Adhesive

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Faculty mentor: Jeffrey Bates
In many applications dehydration, sensors can help save lives. to get a dehydration sensor that is portable and gives you real-time data without being invasive is where the research comes in. I have been working on the adhesive that will adhere a hydrogel with a pressure sensor onto the surface of the inside of the cheek. The properties this adhesive needs is to allow all mass and ions to pass through the adhesive in order for it to reach the bulk hydrogel as well as adhere to the cheek.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1035647@umail.utah.edu
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Poster #27: Simran Karim – Analysis of Hemodynamics in Porcine Arteriovenous Fistulas

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Faculty mentor: Yan-Ting Shiu
My project aims to perform MRI-based computational fluid dynamics to understand how hemodynamics effect arteriovenous fistula vascular access in porcine blood vessels. In this case, we’re using porcine blood vessels because of their close similar to human blood vessels. This research may potentially help chronic kidney disease patients have a successful hemodialysis treatment with less complications.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1110980@utah.edu
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Poster #47: Dylan Hutchings – Searching Through Memory and Space for the Effect of Repeat Search

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Faculty mentor: Trafton Drew
We recorded ERP components to better understand the long-term memory encoding process for visual stimuli. . We hypothesized that successfully finding a target would create an “attentional gate”. An attentional gate would increase the accuracy of finding the object when searching for it later. Our main research question is what is the effect of finding or not finding targets during repeated searches on encoding visual information into long-term memory.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1137810@utah.edu

 

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Oral #5: Carter Christensen – Field Focusing for Implantable Telemetry Antennas

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Faculty mentor: Cynthia Furse

Implantable medical devices (IMDs) have the potential to get smaller and smaller. This research examines one option for making electrically small, implantable antennas viable.

Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: cartermchris1@gmail.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster #17: Hayley Tankersley – Literature Search on Women in Early Antennas Research

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Faculty mentor: Jamesina Simpson
This research was a UROP project funded for Spring 2020 (project was started Fall 2019 and continued through early Spring 2021). The goal was to do a literature search of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Journal between the years 1955-1974 in order to determine how often, if at all, women were included in the acknowledgements section. We considered both authors and acknowledgees within papers from this journal, and conducted further research to determine gender and relevant accomplishments.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1198672@utah.edu
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Poster #29: Alexander Sperber – A Novel Approach to Differentiating Cardiac Fibroblasts from iPSCs

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Faculty mentor: Martin Tristani-Firouzi
As of 2017, 1 in 4 deaths are due to heart disease in the U.S. Cardiac fibroblasts are a type of support cell in the heart that can be involved with disease states leading to heart disease. This project aims to differentiate cardiac fibroblasts from stem cells more effectively and quickly compared to a well established protocol. Our new protocol successfully generated cardiac fibroblasts which were confirmed with flow cytometry using many well-established markers for cardiac fibroblasts.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1075532@umail.utah.edu
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Poster #24: Heba Sultan – The influence of time-restricted feeding on arterial function in obese mice

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Faculty mentor: John Dave Symons
Endothelial dysfunction resulting from systemic inflammation and / or metabolic disruption precipitates many ages and obesity-associated vascular complications. Time-restricted feeding (TRF) prevents metabolic diseases in mice fed an obesogenic diet, but its effect on endothelial function is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that TRF attenuates age and obesity-induced dysfunction of mesenteric and cerebral arteries.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1249866@utah.edu
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Poster #5: Carmencita Totua – Mental Health in Pacific Islander Communities

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Faculty mentor: Annie Fukushima
Researching mental health within Pacific Islander Communities became an interest to me because I am of this community. I have experienced firsthand that this is not a topic that is freely discussed. It is just as important to take care of one’s mental health as one’s physical health. Due to the taboo of the subject, I want to bring more light to it and continue if not start the conversation.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: Carmencita.Totua@utah.edu
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Poster #21: Alisha Chong – Identifying Biomarkers of Insufficient Sleep Utilizing Plasma Metabolomics

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Faculty mentor: Christopher Depner
Insufficient sleep is linked to other health conditions like diabetes. However, the mechanism by which insufficient sleep leads to increased diabetes risk is not well known. This study aims to identify metabolites affected by insufficient sleep, some of which may also be linked to decreased insulin sensitivity. This may provide information on how insufficient sleep affects diabetes risk. Branched-chain amino acids show promise to providing such insight, but data collection is still ongoing.
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Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1192147@umail.utah.edu
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Oral #15: Annie Giokas – Noetherian Property of Invariant Rings

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Faculty mentor: Anurag K. Singh
A Noetherian ring of characteristic 0 will have will have a Noetherian invariant ring under a finite group action. However, this is not true in other cases. We constructed a class of rings of characteristic p for each prime integer p such that each ring in the class is Noetherian with a finite group G acting on it such that the ring of invariants under this group action is not Noetherian. This class of rings is generalized from a characteristic 2 counterexample due to Nagarajan, in 1968.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: annie.giokas@gmail.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster #33: Katelyn Pyper – Testing of Split-beta-Lactamase Constructs for Therapeutic Application

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Faculty mentor: Shawn Owen
The primary goal of targeted drug delivery is to reduce negative side effects associated with existing drug treatments for diseases like cancer. Previous targeted drug delivery methods have failed to eliminate side effects associated with premature activation of cancer drug away from the target site. The aim of this research is to produce, purify, and test the functionality of split-beta-lactamase constructs to activate drug only at the targeted tumor site.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1182692@utah.edu
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Poster #48: Seokjin Jeong – The Effect of Listening to Degraded Speech on Driving Performance

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Faculty mentor: Amy McDonnell
This research examined the effect of listening to a degraded speech on driving performance. Past studies have shown that conversing while driving significantly decreases driving performance. However, past research lacks ecological validity since the speech participants listened to was clear and pristine. Here, we examined whether listening to degraded speech produces similar results. Results of this study indicate that listening to degraded speech puts an extra cognitive load on drivers.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: Seokjin.Jeong@utah.edu
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Poster #1: Samantha Eddy – Cultural Resource Mapping

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Faculty mentor: Shundana Yusaf
The goal of this project was to gather the narratives of my people’s relationship to building, the landscape, the Hogan, the home, animals, and construction rituals. These stories are important to collect because they are needed to help develop resources that would assist in the development of my people. In addition, non-Indigenous architects and planners need this type of research to enrich their knowledge of Indigenous People and communities to appropriately develop strategies for their future.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1170298@utah.edu
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