2021 URS

Poster #167: Emilia Lewis – Range Expansion of Pinus edulis (Colorado pinyon): Early Colonization of the Northernmost North American Population, Crawford Mountains, Utah

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Larry Coats
Colorado pinyon pine have a documented history of migration in the face of climatic changes. Detection of the migration of plants in response to climatic changes has largely depended upon the analysis of the contents of packrat middens. The existing population in the Crawford Mountains is on the extreme northernmost edge of their distribution. This population provides a unique opportunity to understand the age of this far-flung population, and the interaction between the species and climate.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0626405@utah.edu
<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #166: Samantha Kraus – Rate Profiling the Impact of Remote Functional Groups on the Redox-Relay Heck Reaction

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Matthew Sigman
The redox-relay Heck reaction allows for the construction of quaternary stereocenters with high enantioselectivity. Previous kinetic studies revealed the impact of distance between alkene and terminal group on the rate of a variety of alcohols. This study examines the effect of the terminal group on the rate of the redox-relay Heck reaction and employs the tools of Multivariate Linear Regression to create a predictive model for the rate of reaction.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1240731@utah.edu
<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #159: Kelsey Maltby – Inclusive Education: Possibilities and Limitations

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Kim Hackford-Peer
This research compares Utah and California grade 8 social science state standards and instructional materials, like textbooks, to see how curriculum varies between the two. California was chosen because it was the first to pass curriculum mandates that required the contributions of LGBT Americans, persons with disabilities, and other minority groups to be included in the curriculum taught in K-12 schools. Utah was chosen because education history is complexly tied to the conservative LDS church.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1042568@utah.edu
<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #163: Erin Carroll – The Effects of Social Isolation on Mouse Mating, Behavior, and Mouse USVs

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Moriel Zelikowsky
Social behavior is important for many animal species to survive and reproduce. Social behavior involves complex interactions between animals in a group. Mice are a social species and are often used as a model system for research related to social behavior and associated neural circuits. An important aspect of social behavior in mice is ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs). We hypothesized that prolonged social isolation would lead to maladaptive changes in mouse USVs during courtship behavior.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: gcarrolle@gmail.com

 
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #168: Carrie Marsh – Using Water Purification Devices in Group International Study Abroad Travel to Reduce Single-Use Plastic Water Bottle Use

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Jennifer Follstad-Shah
Single-use plastics are an issue in developing countries and students participating in learning abroad programs contribute to it in their reliance on bottled water while traveling. Background research, surveys, and campus partnerships were used to better understand the issue and consider ways in which drinking water could be better addressed by learning abroad programs. Increasing education and use of water purification devices and methods in study abroad programs is an opportunity for change.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: carrie.marsh@utah.edu
View my YouTube presentation here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6oLVsiW8wV8
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #165: Brooklyn Darby – Cell Migration Rates of In Vivo Conditions Compared to In Vitro Conditions

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Minna Roh-Johnson
Cell migration is an important biological process in embryology, wound healing, and cancer. The traditional two-dimensional metastatic model shows that cells utilize focal adhesion complexes to migrate. An important component in forming focal adhesion dynamics is paxillin, a protein that is integral to focal adhesion and is regulated by phosphorylation. I am analyzing the importance of phosphorylated paxillin in in vivo conditions to in vitro conditions on its impact of cell migration rates.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: brookie.darby@utah.edu
<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #155: Alyssia Blackburn – The Language of Police Brutality: A Thematic Analysis

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Annie Fukushima
This project analyzed discourse circulating in the Salt Lake Tribune describing violence towards people of color by the police within the last year of the Trump administration from Jan 20, 2020, to Jan 20, 2021. It consisted of a thematic analysis of articles mined through the Marriott Library online database. My data were recorded in an Excel spreadsheet. This spreadsheet contained a list of 54 themes which language from the articles was categorized under.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: U0817559@umail.utah.edu
<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #62: Taylor Boyd – Homeostatic Plasticity in the Retina in Inherited Eye Disease

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Frans Vinberg
Homeostatic plasticity and its impact on retinal disease on a population and individual level
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: boyd.tayloralexis@utah.edu
<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #157: Rosemary Fifita – COVID-19 Amongst Pacific Islanders in Utah

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Jacob Fitisemanu, Jr
I seek to the understand reasons why Pacific Island (PI) Communities in Utah have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 and to examine the  health disparities surrounding these issues.  Pacific Islander communities are overrepresented for COVID-19 infections and the results have been devastating. We have come to an environment which has proven unfriendly and unwilling to help a growing community of people seeking a better way of life and uncover these issues.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0220247@utah.edu

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Performance #12: Katherine Nielson – I Gig, You Gig: Operating in a Ride-Share Capacity as a Woman of Color

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Annie Isabel Fukushima
Artist’s Statement: Katherine Nielson was born in Atlanta, Georgia and adopted to Utah in 1987. She began her undergraduate degrees in Ethnic Studies and Kinesiology in 2015 at the University of Utah. She is a Spring-2021 Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award recipient through Ethnic Studies.
Her project, I Gig, You Gig, is part of a larger project the Gender-Based Violence Consortium. She is the author and actor of a personal narrative that highlights her experience as woman of color operating in a ride-share capacity. She participated in writing and acting workshops to explore a moment where a decision is made and the resulting complaint process. The Gender-Based Violence Consortium honors her story her narrative joins a wider conversation of narratives.  
Watch my performance below!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: nielson.katherine.sue@gmail.com

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #156: Cierra Colombini – Transforming Barriers to Success of NA/AN-NH/PI STEM Students

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Hokulani Aikau
Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (NA/AN- NH/PI) are underrepresented in STEM majors and those in a STEM major face many barriers. I will be researching NA/AN-NH/PI STEM students at the University of Utah that will help answer my research questions;
What barriers do NA/AN-NH/PI students in STEM majors face?
What strategies or programs exist to help them?
What resources are available or need to be developed to ensure student success?
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: cierra.colombini@utah.edu
<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #158: Sierra Holmes – Visioning Gender in a Post-Abolition After-life

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Ella Myers
This research connects concepts from the bodies of decolonial and prison abolitionist literature to create a speculative fiction about a society without prisons. This project hypothesizes that without prisons, the social construct of gender will dissolve.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: sierra.a.holmes3@gmail.com
&lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”&gt;&lt;/span&gt;
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #162: Courtney Cookson – Preventing Bacteria Growth on Ear Ventilation Tubes via Microtextured Surfaces

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Bart Raeymaekers
In this research I found microtextured designs that will be used on the surface of ear ventilation tubes. The purpose is to inhibit bacteria growth. The designs are made by considering the critical dimensions of bacteria, analyzing the engineered roughness model, and ensuring there are pathways for the bacteria to travel.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1139055@utah.edu

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #164: Anna Garcia – Dignified Care: An analysis of Emergency Medicine’s prioritization of understanding racism within the field

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Clay Mann
Medical journals publish what is considered to be the most important work within their field, making that work the focus of attention for funding and further research. I am doing a content analysis of the top two U.S. Emergency Medicine academic research journals to determine how much the discipline values research on race and racism by counting the number of articles that focus on these subjects that are published in these journals.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: annagia06@gmail.com

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #160: Stephanie Ponce – Dental Care Access within the Latinx Community in Utah

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Annie Isabel Fukushima
This is an ongoing research project that examines the Latinx community’s access to dental care and the barriers faced in seeking such resources in Utah. To examine the experiences of the community, sociological methods of surveys are being used. With the partnership of the Midvale Community Clinic, a non-profit organization that offers affordable medical and dental services, anonymous surveys are being handed out to voluntary participants that identify as Latinx and are 18 years or older.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: stephanie.ponce16@yahoo.com
<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #161: Camilla Flores – Effectiveness of translanguaging pedagogical strategies on secondary and Spanish-speaking newcomers

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Veronica Valdez
The goal of my research was to explore how and which translanguaging pedagogical strategies support Spanish-speaking and middle-school newcomers’ success in creating a space for vulnerability and ultimately, inclusion through literature arts courses.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0902522@utah.edu
<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Oral #45: Drew Kiel – How Branding Influences Our Willingness to Pay for Necessity Products

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Abbie Griffin
My research investigates relationships between some core marketing tactics and consumer willingness to pay – specifically for necessity products. These relationships including branding, distributional availability, environmental consciousness, and health consciousness. The research was conducted by looking at willingness to pay for bottled water using a conjoint survey and surveying University of Utah students. It was determined that branding impacts willingness to pay, but the other’s don’t.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: drewrkiel@gmail.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE

 
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Oral #35: Ayana Amaechi – Understanding Sex Differences in Pathological Aggression with a Mouse Model

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Marco Bortolato
I researched pathological sex differences in aggression & how they could further advance neurodevelopmental disorder characterizations. My study focused on understanding the mechanism behind Aggressive Behavior (ASB) disorder through gene/sex/environment interactions by comparing testosterone levels & genetic inclination towards low monoamine oxidase A expression. In order study this, I partook in both benchwork & clinical processes, & learned many skills to better understand this mechanism.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1131187@utah.edu
&amp;lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”&amp;gt;&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;

 
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #86: Boe Ericksen – Searching for Lunar Interior heterogeneities though a complexity analysis of deep lunar moonquakes

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Michael Thorne
I will examine data from these deep moonquakes using a sliding window multi-scale sample entropy (MSSE) approach to measure complexity in the lunar seismic wavefield. The goal of this study is to determine if additional arrivals are hidden in the lunar seismograms that have not previously been detected. The end result of detecting such arrivals would be the discovery of new heterogeneity and possibly new layering within the lunar interior.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: boe.ericksen@gmail.com
<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Performance #3: Duke Ross – OSARU-CHAN

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Miriam Sobrino
Artist’s Statement: For as long as I can remember, I’ve had this fascination with Japanese art and culture. In terms of appreciation of beauty and the ability to produce art that reflects it, I would say that Japan has been and continues to be a world leader. During the lockdown in late spring/early summer of 2020, I did a deep dive into Akira Kurosawa’s black and white samurai epics of the mid-century and felt this almost childlike sense of enthusiasm. Between the romanticized version of Edo period Japan comparable to the American fantasy of the West, the fascinating character archetypes, and the visual spectacle that many contemporary films fail to replicate, I found myself falling in love with this particular set of work.
To me, Americana has always translated to this notion of the “melting pot.” I believe that the mix of backgrounds, culture, and values present in the U.S. are what make American art and pop culture so rich and unique. “Osaru-Chan” is a genre-blend a la Shinichirō Watanabe, mixing elements of the Japanese Samurai epic, the American crime thriller, and horror. Especially given the current socio-political climate, more specifically all of the anti-Asian sentiment in the United States, I personally feel as though it’s more important than ever to participate in cultural exchange through cinema. 
Watch my performance below!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: dukerossfilms@gmail.com

 
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #127: Kasey Lindstrom – Bears Ears National Monument: A Critique on the Trump Administration’s Abolishment of Federal Lands Protections

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Tabitha Benney
Pursuant to the ongoing lawsuits in May of 2020 and the legislative and legal interpretation of the U.S. Constitution and Antiquities Act of 1906, the abolishment of Bears Ears National Monument by President Trump is illegal and unconstitutional (3).
Until the legality of the Trump administration’s change in federal designation is determined in a court of law, the BLM should not proceed in implementing any management plans of the public lands in southern Utah.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: kasey.lindstrom14@gmail.com
 
&lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”&gt;&lt;/span&gt;

 
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Oral #6: Alex Rinn – Numerical Simulation of Porous Media with Embedded Fracture Patterns

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Pania Newell
Using finite element analysis and experiemental data to conclude how the angle of fractures in a limestone sample effect von mises stress within the sample.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: AlexRinn334@gmail.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE

 
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #26: Michael Jarzin Jr. – Epidemiological Modeling of SARS-CoV-2 in Wastewater

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Jennifer Weidhaas
Epidemiological modeling of SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater is helpful to analyze the methodology of wastewater epidemiology. Using statistical methods including Pearson’s correlation, time series, and lagged correlation analyses to find trends and correlations in wastewater that may contain the virus SARS-CoV-2, the study found small and insignificant correlations between wastewater samples containing SARS-CoV-2 and clinical case data. Future research might address long term studies of the method.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1089561@umail.utah.edu
&lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”&gt;&lt;/span&gt;

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Abigail Hamblin – How social isolation has affecting the mental health of young adults during the COVID-19 pandemic

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Rachel Borup
I decided to research how social isolations affected the mental health of young adults during the covid-19 pandemic, and interviewed someone with firsthand experience on this.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: abby.hamblin@gmail.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #22: Nathan Hansen – Microwell Based Digital Growth Assays for Studying Cell-to-Cell Heterogeneity in Growth

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Thomas Zangle
We validate the use of microwell arrays as a platform for digital cell growth assays. This approach shows improvements over traditional bulk cell counting assays by capturing cell-to-cell heterogeneity information in addition to population-based averages. To ensure accessibility, imaging was conducted manually at three time steps. Experiments with both nonadherent and adherent cell lines validate population-based measures of doubling time while showing the spread of individual cell growth rates.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: hansen.nate98@gmail.com

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #47: Elle Gaudette – The Association of Dizziness with Physiological and Balance Deficits

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Peter Fino
To further assess the origin of dizziness in individuals with mild Traumatic Brain Injury, my study assessed self reported levels of dizziness and compared them to autonomic and balance measures.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: elle.gaudette@gmail.com

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #80: Forest Streeter – Deficiency in a Regulator of G-Protein Signaling, Loco, Protects D. melanogaster from Effects of a High Salt Diet

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Aylin Rodan
Under the supervision of Dr. Rodan, a senior nephrologist at the University of Utah specializing in renal disorders and hypertension, I will use multiple genotypes of D. Melanogaster including genomic mutant and RNAi strains to analyze the effects of a salty diet on aging. In addition, I will consider the possibility of rescuing high salt sensitivity with mutations to a regulator in G-protein signaling, Loco.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: forestkstreeter@gmail.com
<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>

 
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #133: Rachel Morse – Subjective Motivation’s Role on the Error-Related Negativity

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Amy McDonnell
Our study looked at the role of subjective, self-reported motivation on the Error-Related Negativity (ERN) amplitude. The ERN is a neural component that monitors and compensates when you make a mistake. Previous studies show a positive link between manipulated motivation and ERN amplitude. Our study looked at subjective motivation’s link to ERN amplitude, but did not find a significant effect. Future studies should look at differences in motivation constructs and their roles in error processing.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: rachelamorse22@gmail.com

 

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #142: Bailey Smith – Marriage Dynamics in an Early American History: A View from the Knapp Genealogy

 
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Shane Macfarlan
Marriage data from one particular American family genealogy shows that age at first marriage increased over time while spousal age gaps remained roughly the same. These are important due to their effects on society – including gender equality.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0663823@utah.edu


<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #123: SuYeon Gwak – National Inferiority Complex Of Korea: The Influence Of Historical Experience And Han On The National Inferiority Complex

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Daniel Porter Morgan
This paper researched the orrelation between Korea’s national inferiority complex, Han, and historical background. Even though Korea became a minor global power, Koreans still feel inferior to their international position. Reason for this is because Korean experienced colonization and division by external forces in the past. Pain from the past acccumulated Han, which is a unique Korean sentiment, and Han affected Korean’s inferiority complex, which continues in modern days.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1212755@utah.edu


<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #122: Angel Griego – Understanding primary school children’s academic performance: canopy cover, pollution, and socio-demographic factors in Utah public schools.

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Sara Grineski
Tree canopy coverage, exposure to acute air pollution, and school disadvantage levels have all been associated with student academic proficiency. However, little research has examined the interaction of these factors. Our research aims to address this gap utilizing Generalized Estimating Equations. Our results indicate that increasing tree canopy coverage is associated with improvements to student academic performance, with high canopy cover having a protective effect against pollution exposure.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1103010@utah.edu


<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #130: Tyla Meadows – When anger fades, other negative emotions come to the surface.

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Monisha Pasupathi
Previous research suggests that narrating an experience may lead to lower levels of the predominant emotion associated with the event. Adolescents, ages 8-17, were asked to think of a recent event in their life in which they felt angry at another person. We found that sadness and fear intensity does not necessarily become stronger than feelings of anger post-narration, but that feelings of anger lessen to an extent that allows already-present feelings of sadness and fear to be acknowledged.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1089540@utah.edu

 

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #128: Syrenna Lisonbee – Living Allyship: How Perceived Allyship of Their Co-Residents Predicts LGBT Individuals’ Well-Being

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Jacqueline Chen
Past research reveals that, in the U.S., stigma from straight people has been linked to higher stress among LGBT individuals. This research examines how LGBT individuals’ well-being is predicted by straight people with whom they live. Specifically, our goal was to examine how LGBT individuals’ perceptions of their straight co-residents’ allyship corresponded with the pair’s relationship quality and LGBT individuals’ well-being.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: syrenna.lisonbee@gmail.com


<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #121: Lyra Gills – Living While Alive: A Brief Proposal for Puerto Pirámides, Argentina, to Attain Blue Zone Project Community (BZPC) Status

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Lori Kowaleski-Jones
Observed and compared the community of Puerto Pirámides, Argentina to each Blue Zone location and Power 9 trait during a four day period in 2018.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0882111@umail.utah.edu

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #143: Maia Southwick – “I never felt like I was heard”: Feeling Heard in Disagreements Across Relationships

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Monisha Pasupathi
My thesis sought to explore what may contribute to whether we feel heard in conflict. The experience of “feeling heard” during interpersonal conflict may not only be related to what occurs and what is perceived during a disagreement, but with who the disagreement is with. Understanding the association between one’s psychological experience and the relationships conflict occurs in may help us identify factors that promote constructive interactions during conflict with those most important to us.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: maia.southwick@utah.edu

 
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #139: Alyssa Phillips – Guilt and Shame: Does Emotion Affect Expressive Reluctance?

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Monisha Pasupathi
Expressive reluctance (ER) occurs when an individual feels an emotion, but for whatever reason decides not to express it. ER levels vary from person to person, but for this study, we will test if ER levels vary depending on what emotion is being expressed. Participants wrote two narratives: one about a time when they felt guilty and one about a time when they felt ashamed. We expect that ER levels will be higher in shame narratives because individuals will want to hide their emotions.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: alyssa18631@gmail.com


<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Sara Cademartori – The Impact of COVID-19 on Mental Health

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Rachel Borup
The COVID-19 pandemic has changed our lives drastically. Several studies show that it has negatively impacted our mental health.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: smcadem@icloud.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE 

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #117: Roarke Cullenbine – The Effects of Recreational Marijuana Legalization on Drug-related Crime: Evidence From Colorado, Oregon, and Washington

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Guangzhen Wu
The proposed research question goes as follows: Have states with recreational marijuana laws experienced a substantial increase or decrease in such drug-specific crimes as possession and sales of marijuana, heroin, synthetic narcotic, and other drugs? Preliminary data results show that more serious drug crime increases with the presence of the legalization in recreational states while lowering marijuana crime. More analysis is needed to provide a greater insight on the preliminary results.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1168369@utah.edu
&lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”&gt;&lt;/span&gt;
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #31: Kevin Ngo – Calibration of digital holographic microscope for comparative study of quantitative phase microscopy systems

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Thomas Zangle

Calibration of a digital holographic microscope in order to make a comparative study between store-bought systems and homegrown systems as well as provide a comparison between different types of quantitative phase microscopy systems.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: kevngo21@gmail.com

 
<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page


Poster #113: Daniel Anderson – Stress Physiology in Response to Prolonged Periods in Nature

<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page
Faculty mentor: Emily Scott
This project explores the effects prolonged nature exposure has on humans. A lot of prior research that demonstrates the benefits on nature has been limited to lab simulated settings, so this project immerses participants in nature throughout a 5 day trip. In which, we explored how it influenced human biomarkers for stress. Results were surprising, indicated nature did not alleviate stress according to the biomarker we used, heart-rate variability.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1055919@utah.edu


<< Return to the Virtual URS Main Page