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Poster #30: BILLY NGUYEN – Elucidating the Molecular Mechanism of Action of the Microsclerodermins

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Faculty mentor: Aaron Puri
Methane-oxidizing bacterium Methylobacter tundripaludum makes a natural product that inhibits the growth of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.Genetic studies and analytical chemistry strongly suggest this compound is a microsclerodermin.Our results from the project show that yeast in log phase are much more susceptible to the compound than stationary phase cells. The result supports the hypothesis that the microsclerodermins have a specific molecular target worthy of further investigation
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: billynguyen9814@gmail.com


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Poster #20: VALERIE FERNANDEZ – Understanding the Incidence and Risk Factors Associated With Travelers’ Diarrhea

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Faculty mentor: Daniel Leung
The aim of this study is to determine the incidence and risk factors associated with travelers’ diarrhea. To do this, I analyzed data from post-travel surveys and completed bivariate and multivariable analysis. Factors with higher association to travelers’ diarrhea based on the multivariable analysis include travelers who visited SE Asia and/or Africa, went with a larger group, visited rural/countryside regions, had a longer trip duration, and used TD prevention medications/supplements.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: valerieferdls@gmail.com


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Poster #34: JAMIE GOETZ – Experimental Archaeology: Modeling the Costs of Groundstone tool-use for Maize Consumption in Range Creek Canyon, Utah

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Faculty mentor: Shannon Boomgarden
This experiment adds to the data set exploring how costly it was it to be a Fremont farmer in Range Creek Canyon, UT, and why they made the decisions they made? This research aids in understanding this question by gathering quantitative data (kcals/hour) on the cost of processing maize for consumption. In addition to the quantitative data, participants in actualistic experiments provide many observations about the process of grinding maize that ethnographic/archaeological records cannot provide.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1088885@utah.edu


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Poster #24: RILEY MURRAY – Bioavailable Strontium For Archaeological Studies In Modern Manhattan, New York

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Faculty mentor: Diego Fernandez
200 burials were uncovered in Manhattan’s Spring Street Cemetery. These individuals represent a diverse population, and offer a great opportunity for studying population migration. Our research uses strontium isotopes to distinguish between locals and migrants in Manhattan. We are particularly interested in a key question: can we use the Strontium 87/86 isotopic ratio as an elemental tracer to establish a local and nonlocal human population in a complex urban environment like modern Manhattan?
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: rileymurray1324@gmail.com
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Poster #2: VERONICA LUKASINSKI – Visualizing Gender-Based Violence Policy Data Collection for the State of Utah

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Faculty mentor: Annie Fukushima
This presentation introduces the still ongoing process of reviewing gender-based violence policies found in the state of Utah. The methodology is provided and preliminary findings are explored. Ultimately, this research will contribute to the “Visualizing Gender-Based Violence” project conceived by the University of Utah’s Gender-Based Violence Consortium, which will include resources to various social services, along with policy information.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0744845@utah.edu

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Poster #19: FATIMA FAIZI – Type 1 diabetes self-care: your daily dose of diabetes

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Faculty mentor: Man Hung
My research on the factors associated with type 1 diabetes was conducted online through pubmed. Diabetes is a disease that affects people across the lifespan, from childhood to adulthood, one can be diagnosed with diabetes at any age and at any time in their life. There are two types of diabetes type 1(T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D).This research is focused specifically on T1D. There are many factors that are associated with T1D such as sleep deprivation, high fructose corn syrup, and caffeine.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: fatima.n.faizi@gmail.com


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Poster #4: JIMENA MURILLO – Psychology and Intervention Use

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Faculty mentor: Zac Imel
The following research study analyzed the components of psychotherapy. The effectiveness of psychotherapy has been attributed to a combination of specific interventions, techniques, and common elements (common factors) that are widely used across different approaches in therapy (Wampold & Imel, 2015). We hypothesized that therapists who have a high rating of common factor items will utilize more specific non-CF interventions compared to therapists with low common factor ratings.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1094899@umail.utah.edu


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Poster #38: JOSHUA URRY – The mediating role of coping behaviors in the relation between partner relationship quality and infant stress

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Faculty mentor: Robert Vlisides-Henry
This study examined the association between a mother’s partner relationship quality during pregnancy and her infant’s stress signs after birth and if the mother’s coping behaviors during pregnancy mediated this relation. It was found that partner relationship quality during pregnancy was not associated with infant stress signs and coping behaviors did not act as a mediator. However, coping behaviors did act as a mediator between partner relationship quality and depression.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0974295@umail.utah.edu
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Poster #36: SALLY MATTHEWS – Determining Kinship in Wild Savanna Chimpanzees (Pan Troglodytes Verus) from Fongoli, Senegal

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Faculty mentor: Leslie Knapp
Analyzing genetic diversity in a population can be valuable in anticipating the possible effects environmental change can have on a population. My project will be to identify microsatellites in nuclear DNA to create unique genotypic profiles of individual chimpanzees to examine relatedness, assess genetic diversity in the populations. I aim to test the hypothesis that male chimpanzees will be more related in the population than the female chimpanzees.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0576515@utah.edu


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Research Opportunity: Summer Internship in Biomedical Research

The 2021 Summer Internship Program in Biomedical Research (SIP) provides interns with a summer of intensive research in an NHLBI laboratory on NIH’s main campus in Bethesda, MD. Interns receive a competitive stipend based on their education level. Students will attend monthly summer lectures and career development events including Summer Poster Day and the Graduate School Fair. The SIP is open to current college, graduate, or medical school students with a minimum 3.0 GPA. Selections are made on a rolling basis therefore early submission is highly recommended.
Eligibility: The 2021 Summer Internship Program is for students who

are 17 years of age or older on June 15, 2021,
are U.S. citizens or permanent residents, AND
are enrolled at least half-time in and accredited college (including community college) or university as an undergraduate, graduate, or professional student at the time of application*, OR
 have been accepted into accredited college or university program for the fall semester.

Application Deadline: March 1st, 2021
For more information and to apply, visit this NHLBI webpage. Any questions can be directed to the NHLBI DIR Office of Education: ( direducation@nhlbi.nih.gov ).

 
 


Research Opportunity: Fellowship for Underrepresented Scientists

The RADM Helena O. Mishoe Fellowship for Underrepresented Scientists was established by Dr. Helena Mishoe to offer opportunities for postbac fellows of underrepresented groups in biomedical science to receive training in basic, translational, and clinical research. This fellowship aims to enhance career development for postbacs planning to apply to graduate and/or medical school with the long-term career goal of becoming a trained scientist or physician/scientist.
Applicants should meet the following criteria:

Have recently completed or will complete a bachelor’s degree by the summer of selection;
Must have completed academic training in course work relevant to biomedical, behavioral, or statistical research;
Have a cumulative grade point average of 3.3 or better on a 4.0 scale, or 4.3 or better on a 5.0 scale;
Be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

Application Deadline: December 31st, 2020
For more information and to apply, visit this NHLBI webpage. Any questions can be directed to the NHLBI DIR Office of Education: ( direducation@nhlbi.nih.gov ).

 
 


Poster #23: KAITLYN STEVENS – Identifying RNAi Modifiers Leading to Cellular Apoptosis in Retinal Degeneration

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Faculty mentor: Clement Chow
Our lab performed a study that examined the effect of genetic variation on Drosophila models; using a genome-wide association study, we identified candidate modifiers. The majority of these candidate genes were ones that influenced variation in retinal degeneration played a part in apoptosis. I helped perform a new apoptosis-specific screen to find additional modifier genes. Among several hits, here I will present data on one promising gene, bru1.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1025471@utah.edu
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Poster #10: AUSTIN JOHNSON – Efficacy of a Hospital-Based Exercise Program on Physical Outcomes linked with Survival Among Cancer Survivors

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Faculty mentor: Adriana Coletta
In this retrospective study, we assessed change in cancer treatment-related side effects linked with survival, such as cardiorespiratory fitness, physical function, and muscular endurance after participation in Huntsman Cancer Institute’s clinical exercise oncology program called the Personal Optimism With Exercise Recovery (POWER) program.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1008448@utah.edu
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Poster #21: YINGRI LI – Affinity purification of histidine-tagged galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT)

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Faculty mentor: Kent Lai
The main goal of this project was to develop and refine the purification process of GALT, in order to use this protein for further identification of inhibitors.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: annie826.li@gmail.com
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Poster #35: SU JIN HWANG – The Association Between Pre-Existing Depressive Symptoms and COVID-19 Related Stress Among Adoptive Parents

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Faculty mentor: Lee Raby
Prior studies have shown the association between depression symptoms and the impact of COVID-19 pandemic among the general population. This study aims to examine whether level of depressive symptoms prior to the pandemic is associated with various outcomes during the pandemic among adoptive parents: overall level of stress related to COVID-19, sleep quality, and distress due to their family’s reduced access to positive social interactions due to social isolation.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1059878@utah.edu
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Poster #40: ZACK BISKUPIAK – Understanding the Operational Definition of Mindfulness Meditation

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Faculty mentor: Eric Garland
Mindfulness meditation and mindfulness based interventions are a promising new area of research in the fields of psychology, social work, and more. In order to conduct effective research on an abstract concept such as mindfulness, we need to have a strong operational definition of what it constitutes. Conducted in tandem with Dr. Eric Garlands Center on Mindfulness and Integrative Health Intervention Development (CMIIND), this research project was to examine the specific mechanisms of meditation
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0487471@umail.utah.edu
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Poster #1: NATHAN NELLIS – Econometric Analysis on the Impact of Water Rates on Resident Usage and City Revenue: A Study in Salt Lake County, Utah

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Faculty mentor: Scott Schaefer
My project examines the effect a change in municipal water rates has on water consumption. City officials estimated a 5% increase in water rates would yield a 5% increase in city revenue, but the year after water revenue decreased by 1%. Using linear regression I found average usage should have decreased between 119-238 gallons per month for the average household after the rate change but that the average monthly bill should have risen by $3.43, resulting in an increase in revenue of 1.5-4.2%.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: n8nellis@gmail.com

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Oral #8: MARIO RAMIREZ-ARRAZOLA – Adding Up The Cost of Excluding Undocumented Utahns from State and Federal COVID-19 Relief

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Faculty mentor: Thomas Maloney
My research paper looks at the unfair nature and economics implications of leaving out the Utahn undocumented community from COVID-19 state and federal relief aid. There is quantitative research into the amount of money they were barred from and its implications.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1181736@umail.utah.edu
View my Presentation Slides HERE 

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Poster #28: ANNIE WALTON – Sex Differences in Dispositional Mindfulness and its Effect on Acupuncture Treatment Outcomes

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Faculty mentor: Lisa Taylor-Swanson
This study aimed to improve acupuncture program outcomes for patients who rated their chronic pain as three or greater on a scale of 0-10 for three or more months. The purpose of this thesis was to investigate whether males and females differ in dispositional mindfulness after receiving an acupuncture treatment with or without a mindfulness intervention.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: annie.walton@utah.edu
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Poster #32: EMILY CEBROWSKI – “Weary Feet and Flaked Stone” Testing the predictive power of cost path analysis as a suitability measure for Ideal Free Distribution

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Faculty mentor: Brian Codding
This research project addresses the spatial relationships between the places that prehistoric people lived, and the places they gathered. The Ideal Free Distribution spatial model was used to demonstrate that the lithic quarry was a central focus of the local prehistoric economy of the Lower Dolores River Valley. Research modeling indicates a positive relationship between site density and path suitability.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: emily.cebrowski@gmail.com
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Publication Opportunity: Gender & Sex Differences in Health

Interested in submitting an article to be featured in The Utah Women’s Health Review? Check out this opportunity below for more information!
The University of Utah Center Of Excellence in Women’s Health, in partnership with the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, is thrilled to announce the launch of the Utah Women’s Health Review (UWHR). UWHR is a peer-reviewed journal focused on sex and gender differences that affect the 7 Domains of Health: emotional, environmental, financial, intellectual, physical, social, and spiritual. The journal is an ideal place for your students, residents, fellows, and faculty to publish their research. While the journal showcases the work of local researchers and clinicians on the health of the Utah population, we accept submissions from across our state on populations beyond Utah, as long as they focus on women’s health or sex and gender differences that affect the 7 Domains of Health.
 
The UWHR has been an ongoing project involving all University of Utah Colleges and Schools. The Editorial Board reflects our 1U4U approach to sex and gender health. By creating and hosting this journal here within our own Eccles Digital Publishing, UWHR is able to facilitate publication opportunities to established sex and gender health researchers as well as graduate students, residents, and up-and-coming professionals all over Utah. UWHR’s rolling submissions and publication dates allow for a fast turn-around time as well as a satisfying experience for submitting authors. The site https://uwhr.utah.edu/ houses the earlier 2007 and 2019 issues. Using the WordPress platform, we invite ongoing submissions for 2020 and beyond.


HCI PathMaker Scholars Summer Research Opportunity

The Huntsman Cancer Institute PathMaker Scholars Summer Research Program is currently accepting applications for the Summer 2021 program.
PathMaker Scholars is a one-on-one mentored research experience for high school seniors and undergraduate students from underrepresented or marginalized backgrounds who are interested in pursuing careers in research, medicine, and education. The program sponsors students for a ten-week summer research experience where they will learn laboratory training techniques and work on a project in a university laboratory setting. Accepted students will live on campus and are provided with a $4,000 stipend, housing, a meal plan, and a UTA pass for the duration of the program.
Additional information regarding PathMaker can be found online or in the below flyer.
Application Deadline – 11:59 pm MST on Sunday, February 21st, 2020
Any questions regarding the program should be directed to Katie Stokes and/or Anna Marsden.


Reading Scientific Manuscripts Event

Reading Scientific Manuscripts
Friday, October 16th from 4:00-5:00 pm
The Medical Laboratory Science Professional Club (MLSPC) is excited to announce the kickoff of an undergraduate journal club with our first lecture by Dr. Diana Wilkins, PhD., M.S., MT(ASCP) about breaking down and reading scientific manuscripts. Dr. Wilkins is the Division Chief for the Medical Laboratory Science and the Biomedical Science graduate programs. We are fortunate for the chance to learn from her and will meet via Zoom Friday, October 16th from 4:00-5:00 pm. Following this lecture series, the MLSPC will meet every quarter to review and discuss literature relating to medical laboratory science. This is a great opportunity for undergraduate science majors to practice reading and evaluating primary literature and will greatly benefit not only those who plan to continue onto graduate or professional degree programs but for anyone who will be working as a professional Medical Laboratory Scientist. Please RSVP here: https://forms.gle/DimSnwGEfew3spZPA
This event is NOT part of the Undergraduate Research Education Series.


OUR Open House with the Undergraduate Research Leaders!

Friday, October 2nd from 12pm – 1pm
 
Join the Undergraduate Research Leaders, Claire & Kalli, for our first ever virtual open house!  
 
This a very informal event where you can pop in and chat as fits your schedule.  You can come with questions about how to get started, how to transition to remote work, how to apply for UROP, or just to hang out.
Join Zoom Meeting
https://utah.zoom.us/j/92896109223
 
Meeting ID: 928 9610 9223
Passcode: 276065
 
Hope to see you there!


ORIC Event: Bullying & Misbehavior in the Research Setting: Does the U of U need a Policy?

The Office of Research Integrity & Compliance (ORIC) is pleased to offer the “Bullying & Misbehavior in the Research Setting: Does the U of U need a Policy?” panel discussion as part of the E3 series on Tuesday, September 15th from 10:00am to 11:00am via Zoom.
According to recent scholarly work, bullying is defined as physical, social, and/or verbal actions that cause harm to a person or a group.  These repeated actions present negative consequence for the victim(s) as well as the bully.  Bullying, one form of unprofessional behavior, “always involves aggressive behavior” and a differential in power dynamics.  A recent case in Australia highlights the mechanisms through which this type of behavior occurs.  
This panel dialogue will address what the University of Utah doing to reduce bulling and address professional misconduct in the research setting. Resources on campus will be identified.
To register for this E3 session please CLICK HERE.


Fulbright U.S. Student Program 

Fulbright U.S. Student Program 
Fulbright provides grants for U.S. students wishing to perform research or teach English in a foreign country – please watch this video to learn more about this prestigious opportunity! Senior undergrads and graduate students in all disciplines are eligible to apply.

Please direct questions to: Professor Howard Lehman, Fulbright Program Director: howard.lehman@poli-sci.utah.edu, or Jolyn Schleiffarth, FPA: Jolyn.s@utah.edu


Fall 2020 On-Site Undergraduate Research Policy

Updated 8/11/20: The University has released a policy for on-site undergraduate research in Fall 2020.

All types of undergraduate researchers will be permitted onsite in the upcoming semester. This includes Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) and honors students. Approvals from the Department Chair and Dean (or designee) are required, and you must follow the approval and tracking process outlined here: Fall 2020 Undergraduate Research Policy.
Students should work remotely during the “two-week pause” from September 28 – October 9 and when all classes transition to online format after Thanksgiving break.

For up-to-date guidance, please continue to watch the VPR’s COVID-19 updates page: https://research.utah.edu/coronavirus/index.php


Oral 13: Oralia Aguilar, Jami Margaret Harvey – Oral Histories in the Era of COVID-19: The Utah Navajo and the Westside of Salt Lake City, Utah

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Faculty mentor: Mary Ann Villarreal
Oral Histories in the Era of COVID-19: The Utah Navajo and the Westside of Salt Lake City, Utah is about giving agency and voice to underrepresented communities and the individuals from these communities impacted by COVID-19. Our research consisted of recording and collecting the voices of the undocumented Latinx communities of the Westside of Salt Lake City, and the Utah Navajo communities of San Juan County.
Watch our research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact us at:
Oralia, aguilaroralia41@gmail.com
Jami, jami.margaret@gmail.com
View our Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster 49: Sahar Nikkhah – Joint spectral analysis of Crab Nebula with FERMI-VERITAS-HAWC data​

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Faculty mentor: Dave Kieda
Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) are deflected by Galactic magnetic field in their journey to earth. Hence, they no longer carry directional information. We study gamma-ray emission to indirectly probe CR origin. We have different gamma-ray instruments in the space and the ground to observe the emission at different energy bands. In this analysis, we study the spectral analysis of the Crab Nebula using the data collected by three different observatories
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: nikkhah.1@osu.edu


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Oral 12: Raquel Cifuentes – Gender Roles in Preschool Children’s Storytelling

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Faculty mentor: Cheryl Wright
The purpose of the research was to find patterns and themes in preschool children’s storytelling. Every child was able to make up a story, that they later on acted out in front of the class. Every story was coded to find any patterns that were gender related. The results were consistent with past research that indicated how young children did follow gender themes unconsciously in their storytelling.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: Raquelcifuentes12@gmail.com
View my presentation slides HERE 

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Poster 10: Emma Kerr – Optimization of magnetic coil geometries for coherent control of electron spin states in organic semi-conductor thin films under strong magnetic drive conditions

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Faculty mentor: Christoph Boehme
The purpose of this study is to optimize the geometry of a current-carrying structure that produces a homogenous oscillating magnetic field at radio-frequencies (1-200 MHz) with high amplitude B1. The circuit element should exhibit low impedance and allow for a straightforward application of the radiation field to organic semiconductor thin film devices for the purpose of studying spin-state transitions among pairs of electronic charge-carriers under strong magnetic drives.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: emkerr00@gmail.com

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Oral 9: Zachary Ta and Sarah Trela-Hoskins – Sleep Diet and Physical Activity in the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Faculty mentor: Kelly Baron
How has Covid-19 Impacted Utah citizens routines and habits? We are interested in gathering qualitative, relevant data and understanding the biggest lifestyle changes that we are facing today due to the Coronavirus Pandemic.
Watch our research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at:
Sarah, u1053722@umail.utah.edu
Zachary, u0847565@utah.edu
View our Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster 32: Chris Wallace-Carrete & Marilisa Vega – COVID-19 and the Staff Experience at the University of Utah

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Faculty mentor: Amy Bergerson
When COVID-19 forced the University to suspend all activity on campus, faculty, staff, and students had to adapt in the ways they interact and learn. This research focuses on how COVID-19 has affected University staff members and how staff members’ work has been impacted by COVID-19 related changes. Through our research, we have identified four salient themes that encompass the concerns of University staff members and we provide recommendations on how to address those concerns.
Click below to hear us present our poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at:
Christopher, christopher.wallacecarrete@utah.edu
Marilisa, u1031735@utah.edu
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Poster 11: Ayesha Khan – Developing an AI Warning System for Infectious Respiratory Disease Outbreaks

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Faculty mentor: Tolga Tasdizen
COVID-19 presents itself in regions of the lungs which are filled with fluid instead of air. This is a phenomenon seen in other respiratory diseases, but COVID-19 is unique in that it is present in these regions of the lungs with no known specific pattern or distribution. The aim of this project is to create an AI system that recognizes abnormalities in chest x-rays and present a warning when similar cases are recognized. This allows the opportunity to contain the spread in a population.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0583914@utah.edu
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Poster 42: Nathan Foulk – Interaction corrections for 2D scattering from a hard disk

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Faculty mentor: Mikhail Raikh
It is known that the presence of the Fermi sea modifies the scattering of an electron from a point-like impurity. This is due to the Friedel oscillations of the electron density around the impurity. These oscillations create an additional scattering potential for incident electrons. The closer the energy of the incident electron to the Fermi level, the stronger the additional scattering. We study this effect for the case when the impurity is not point-like but rather a hard disk.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: natefoulk4@gmail.com
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Poster 17: Milan Oxspring – Responding to COVID-19 in Higher Education: Lessons Learned From the 2008 Financial Crisis

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Faculty mentor: Ruth Watkins, Laura Snow, Mike Martineau
In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, leaders in higher education are busy developing strategic plans to guide their institutions through economic turmoil. One approach to finding a blueprint for success is through analysis of university advancement in the decade following the 2008 financial crisis. This project seeks to learn which of the largest public American universities saw the greatest growth and prosperity from 2008-2018 and what factors fostered this success.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: mboxspring@gmail.com

 

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Poster 13: Somi Lee – Psychological Impact of Social Isolation in Older Adults during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Faculty mentor: Joseph Kim
The COVID19 pandemic has brought numerous changes to our lives. In the U.S., many people have been encouraged or even enforced at one point to socially distance themselves and stay-at-home. While social distancing can help prevent the spread of the disease, limited social activity can negatively affect one’s emotional well-being, especially for older adults whose social contacts are often outside the home. The goal of our study is to find out how social isolation impacts one’s mental health.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: somi.lee@utah.edu
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Poster 19: Nathan Pfau – Psychological Impact of Social Isolation during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Faculty mentor: Joseph Kim
COVID-19 has spread at a high rate through the United State and because of this social isolation/distancing has been encouraged or even enforced in some areas. Every little is know about how social isolation can affect the mental health of older people and especially during a pandemic. This study aims to focus on the effect of social isolation on the mental health of older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1044563@utah.edu


 
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Poster 24: Brett Smith – Domestic Violence in the Age of COVID-19

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Faculty mentor: Sonia Salari
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues there are worldwide concerns about domestic violence victims being ordered to stay at home with their abusers. This study is attempting to understand the impact of COVID-19 on domestic violence in Utah. On March 6 Governor Gary Herbert declared a state of emergency in Utah. On March 12 Utah schools were dismissed and remained so through the end of the school year. What impact has this had on the number of child abuse cases and domestic violence in general?
Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0966829@utah.edu
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Oral 5: Isaac Martin – The number of torsion divisors in a strongly F-regular ring is bounded by the reciprocal of F-signature

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Faculty mentor: Karl Schwede
Earlier in 2020, Polstra showed that the cardinality of the torsion subgroupof the divisor class group of a local stronglyF-regular ring is finite. We expand upon thisresult and prove that the reciprocal of theF-signature of a local stronglyF-regular ringRbounds the cardinality of the torsion subgroup of the divisor class group ofR, and provide a necessary and sufficient condition for equality.
Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: isaac.act.martin@gmail.com
View my Presentation Slides HERE

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