Research Opportunity: SOM Research Match for Underrepresented Students

University of Utah School of Medicine helps students from underserved or underrepresented backgrounds (see definition below) find a research opportunity. If you fit the definition and are interested in gaining a research experience, please take the survey here. Once they gather enough data, they will begin matching students up with different labs. You will likely hear back from them by January 2021 at the earliest (but could be later). 

 

If, for some reason, students are unsure if they fit the criteria that are listed below, please email Benjamin Tasevac at benjamin.tasevac@hsc.utah.edu.  Please DO NOT contact him for any other questions.

According to the AAMC, “Underrepresented in medicine means those racial and ethnic populations that are underrepresented in the medical profession relative to their numbers in the general population.” The OHEDI’s takes this definition and tries to make it as broad and inclusive as possible. Thus, any student that self identifies as underserved or underrepresented based on race, religion, sexual orientation or is female, a member of a minority group or identifies as a member of the LGBTQ community, a person of color, is an immigrant, a refugee, first in the family to go to college, and of low socioeconomic status qualifies for our services.

Survey link here as well: Student Research Opportunity Survey 

 

Oral #6: HANNAH BLOMGREN – Influence of Identity on Perception of Belonging and Inclusion in Introductory Physics

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Faculty mentor: Regina Frey

The purpose of the overall project is to explore how students’ perceptions of inclusion and sense of belonging relate to their performance and subsequent retention in introductory STEM courses, and currently, in introductory calculus-based physics courses at the University of Utah. The current academic system for higher education does not retain students in STEM fields equitably, resulting in disparities on a national level for underrepresented groups in the STEM community.

Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: hblomgren001@gmail.com

View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Oral #3: TARA ZAMANI – Spiking Neural Network Modeling and an XOR Application

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Faculty mentor: Neil Cotter

What is the best approach for modeling the human brain using technology?
We believe that Spiking Neural Networks are the next step forward to more accurately representing biological neuron functionality. Through our research, we have developed our own SNN transfer function and applied our SNN model to a common XOR application to both showcase the model’s validity and the utility of having a transfer function as a tool during development.

Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: tara.zamani17@gmail.com

View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster #15: JOHN HUNT, ELENA ORREGO, MARCEL PETERSEN – Rubin (1992) Replication

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Faculty mentor: Rachel Hayes-Harb

We performed a replication study of Rubin (1992), which examined non-language factors affecting undergraduates’ judgements of nonnative English-speaking teaching assistants. Our study’s participants listened to a lecture paired with an image of either a “white” or an “Asian” lecturer. They then took a comprehension test. The participants under the “white” lecturer condition were more accurate on this test on average and rated the “white” lecturer as more competent than the “Asian” one was.

Click below to hear us present our poster!
Questions or comments? Contact
John at: u1217353@utah.edu
Elena at: u1127979@utah.edu
Marcel at: u1014919@utah.edu

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Poster #39: LAUREN ZIEGELMAYER – Examining Changes in Physiological Stress Levels After Exposure to Nature

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Faculty mentor: Emily Scott

Advancements in technology and the urbanization of society has resulted in an overuse of directed attention. Previous research has discovered that recovery happened faster when exposed to nature, rather than urban environments. The current study aims to measure physiological changes after the presence of nature, using electrocardiography (ECG) to measure resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and heart rate (HR) values of participants.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: laurenziegs@gmail.com

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Poster #13: LUKE HARDY, RICARDO SHADE, CHRIS ZHOU – Racial biases affecting undergraduates’ comprehension of instructors, replication of Rubin (1992)

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Faculty mentor: Rachel Hayes-Harb

This study is a replication of Rubin 1992, which tested to see if perceived race of instructor affected the students’ comprehension of the instructor.

Click below to hear us present our poster!
Questions or comments? Contact
Luke at: lukeclaytonhardy@gmail.com
Ricardo at: richi.shade@gmail.com
Chris at: chriszhouzzl97@gmail.com

 

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Poster #17: ZOE PRICE & LYNDSAY ZACCARI – Beyond a Face: Replication of Rubin 1992

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Faculty mentor: Rachel Hayes-Harb

A replication study of Rubin 1992, where he examined undergraduate students’ RLS when listening to non-native teaching assistants. Despite being online, this study followed most of the same procedures, including a matched guise technique. The study finds that there may be some small difference in how well students understand the same voice, depending on whether the face is “Asian” or “Caucasian.”

Click below to hear us present our poster!
Questions or comments? Contact
Zoe at: u0901636@umail.utah.edu
Lyndsay at: u1130726@umail.utah.edu

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Poster #12: CHRIS GRANGER & AUDREY PAXTON – Replication of Rubin (1992) Study on the Effects of Ethnicity on Students’ Perception of Teacher Effectiveness and Accent

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Faculty mentor: Rachel Hayes-Harb

In this study we are replicating Rubin (1992) with materials provided directly from Donald Rubin. Rubin (1992) showed that undergraduate students will often perceive an accent and rate the instructor lower when the instructor is of a different ethnicity, even when the audio samples are exactly the same. We replicated this study as closely as possible and also chose to extend it by recruiting participants from all age groups and locations, rather than just undergraduates as Rubin (1992) did.

Click below to hear us present our poster!
Questions or comments? Contact
Chris at: chrisgranger35@gmail.com
Audrey at: audannpax@gmail.com

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Poster #16: ASPEN JOHNSTON & LUCY SCHOENFELD – Changing Sentiments – The Changing Nature of Reverse Linguistic Stereotyping

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Faculty mentor: Rachel Hayes-Harb

We attempted to replicate Rubin (1992) and surveyed 21 participants across two matched-guise conditions using a listening task and homophily task to determine if their responses showed evidence of reverse linguistic stereotyping. Results were incredibly similar across both conditions, meaning we were unable to replicate the original findings.

Click below to hear us present our poster!
Questions or comments? Contact
Aspen at: aspen.g.johnston@gmail.com
Lucy at: lucyschoenfeld@gmail.com

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Poster #11: KAYLIN BERGESON & MARY CHAVEZ – Effects of Instructor Ethnicity on Native English Speakers: Replication of Rubin (1992)

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Faculty mentor: Rachel Hayes-Harb

This research replicated various aspects of the Rubin (1992) study, we wanted to see whether the findings in the Rubin (1992) study holds up under different circumstances and among a different population. The Rubin (1992) study tested whether students were having difficulty comprehending NNSTAs due to their accents or whether they were making assumptions about a person’s accent solely due to their visages, despite how strong their accents were, or if their accents even existed.

Click below to hear us present our poster!
Questions or comments? Contact
Mary at: u0978434@utah.edu
Kaylin at: kaylin.bergeson@utah.edu

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Poster #37: MASON STEPHENS – Mindfulness and P300 correlational relationship to Time Spent in Nature

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Faculty mentor: David Strayer

Looked at the relationship between time spent in nature and the P300 ERP and self-reported mindfulness ratings. Found that mindfulness increased in nature and that the P3a decreased as mindfulness increased.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: mason_stephens@icloud.com

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Poster #33: EMMA DEAN – The Effect of Maternal Resilience on Newborn Neurobehavioral Outcomes

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Faculty mentor: Elisabeth Conradt

In this study, we investigated whether maternal resilience can act as a moderator of the negative effects of maternal stress on newborn neurobehavioral outcomes. A sample of 162 pregnant women were assessed on their life stressors and resilience level. Their newborns were assessed according to the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS). Mothers who reported more frequent episodic stress had newborns with lower levels of arousal and attention factors.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1044849@utah.edu

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Poster #8: IAN MCCOLLOUGH – Castable Porous Ceramic Insulation

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Faculty mentor: Raymond Cutler

We have been making use of a standard vibrational plate in order to mix ceramic insulation. We have been using an industrial powder and base, and through the use of additives have been trying to alter its physical properties, such as density, strength, and thermal conductivity. We have been doing this through the use of poreformers such as corn starch and alcohol. In the future we hope to scale up production and begin testing for an altering the thermal conductivity of the cast material.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: ian.mccollough@outlook.com

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Oral #5: MICHAEL TAO – Using Collagen-Based Hydrogels To Enhance Cardiomyocyte Differentiation and Direct Structural Alignment In-Vitro

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Faculty mentor: Martin Tristani-Firouzi

The proposed project will optimize engineered collagen-based hydrogels that will serve to mimic the local extracellular matrix to guide human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes towards anisotropic alignment. The project seeks to optimize electromechanical coupling while providing topographical guidance for hPSC-CMs in vivo.

Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: michael.tao@utah.edu

View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster #9: SARAH HUNT – Addressing Air Quality in the Salt Lake Valley Through the Use of Serious Games

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Faculty mentor: Jeff Rose

This research is focused on addressing air quality in the Salt Lake Valley through the design and implementation of a serious game. The project is still in the early stages as interviews are being conducted to inform game design. The interview process and analysis shows important finding regarding air quality in the Salt Lake Valley that will guide the game design process.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: sarahhunt568@gmail.com

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Poster #5: MITCHELL CHILD – Castable, Porous Insulation for Oxygen Generation Applications

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Faculty mentor: Raymond Cutler

Over the last few months we have researched castable ceramic insulation for oxygen generation applications. This involved researching current state of the art of materials used in the industry and this kind of application. The material we needed to create or improve upon needed to be lightweight, strong, and have good insulation for temperatures up to 1200 degrees C. We decided to try and improve the properties of RESCOR-740 and began by characterizing the current material and then adjusting.

Click below to hear my presentation!
Questions or comments? Contact: mitchchild@comcast.net

 

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Oral #4: ALAN CHAVEZ – Master Minds and Artists: Visiting Influencers in the Pre-Civil Rights Era

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Faculty mentor: Elizabeth Craft

During this past year, I was able to comb through the Utah Daily Chronicle archives and extract information on music faculty and events. I compiled this information into spreadsheets for the University’s School of Music History Project. During this process, I was able to glimpse into the past and find an impressive attitude toward civil rights and inclusivity fostered at the U. My presentation will attempt to share that discovery with you.

Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: alan_mchavez@hotmail.com

View my Presentation Slides HERE 

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Oral #2: CANDACE BRYAN – The Relationships between Museums and Native Americans: A Case Study of the Natural History Museum of Utah

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Faculty mentor: Elizabeth Archuleta

My honors thesis is a case study of the Natural History Museum of Utah (NHMU) through a review of the relationships between Native Americans and museums. I studied the history of museums in the U.S. by talking about expositions that began the U.S. anthropology and museum movement. I also researched the ways that Native American people have influenced museums through collaboration and tribal museums. Using this knowledge, I did a case study on the Native Voices exhibit at the NHMU.

Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: 16cbryan6@gmail.com

View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Oral #1: JOE WASSWEILER – Fixing Tuition Inflation

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Faculty mentor: Cord Bowen

Improved information sources could be most impactful in the process of applying for schools where students would benefit from easy access to critical information such as average return on investment based on chosen major and school, realistic comparison of overall costs, and amount of subsidy they can receive before applying for schools.

Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1128278@utah.edu

View my Presentation Slides HERE

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Poster #26: ANTHONY MURADAS – A Mindful Approach to Perceived Stress for Older Adults Receiving Rehabilitation Services in Long-term Care (LTC)

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Faculty mentor: Katarina Felsted

Stress is common among older adults experiencing the need for health care services such as long-term care. High levels of stress have been linked to major physical and psychological health problems. Mindfulness has been shown to create positive outcomes for mental and physical health, including stress reduction. In an attempt to understand if mindfulness interventions can improve outcomes of perceived stress my study aims to evaluate changes in perceived stress after a mindfulness intervention

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0900587@utah.edu


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Poster #18: BRIDGET DORSEY – HEALTHCARE PROVIDER BIAS IN ESTIMATING HEALTH LITERACY OF PARENTS IN A PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

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Faculty mentor: Maija Holsti

Health literacy is a growing concern due to its significant effect on clinical communication and health outcomes. This study aims to quantify the ability of providers to estimate health literacy of parent/guardians in a pediatric emergency department and identify descriptive factors that might be related to misestimates of health literacy.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: bridget.dorsey@utah.edu

 

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Poster #6: BRYCE LARSEN – Promoting Osteogenesis using CRISPR-dCas9-VPR

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Faculty mentor: Robby Bowles

Using CRISPR-dCas9-VPR we upregulated genes in adipose-derived stem cells to see if any played a role in osteogenesis. CRISPR-dCas9-VPR is a modified form of CRISPR-Cas9, instead of cutting DNA it attaches onto and helps the cell express the gene following the place of attachment. We used a modified cell line of adipose-derived stem cells that would fluoresce if undergoing bone cell differentiation. After upregulating thousands of genes we noticed some had an effect on osteogenesis.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: bryce.verl.larsen@gmail.com

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Poster #25: MACK TAWA – Development of the Binary Categorization for Magnetofossil Robustness Model (BCMRM)

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Faculty mentor: Courtney Wagner

Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetite that can be preserved through time. A model was created in order to decipher whether or not a sample contains a magnetofossil vs. an inorganic form of magnetite/greigite. This model incorporates new methods that have previously not been discussed in related reviews.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: mackm.tawa@gmail.com

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Poster #3: JENS NILSON – Child Labor Trafficking and the Child Welfare System

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Faculty mentor: Annie Isabel Fukushima

The purpose of this research was to identify deficiencies in the identification and response to child labor trafficking in the current welfare system. This study accomplishes the following: 1) contributes understandings to child welfare system responses to human trafficking; 2) gathers information about the types of labor trafficking occurring and 3) furthers research on child labor trafficking, with particular attention to responses during COVID-19.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: jenscnilson@gmail.com

 

 

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Poster #14: TARA HOGAN and REBECCA RIVAS – Undergraduate Ethnocentrism

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Faculty mentor: Professor Hayes-Harb

This poster and recording represent the efforts made to replicate Donald Rubin’s 1992 study, “Nonlanguage factors affecting undergraduates’ judgments of nonnative English-speaking teaching assistants.”

Click below to hear us present our poster!
Questions or comments? Contact us at:
Tara Hogan, u0657056@utah.edu
Rebecca Rivas, u1006526@utah.edu  

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Oral #7: MEGHAN BURROWS – Youth, Environment, and Belonging

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Faculty mentor: Adrienne Cachelin

This research project set out to explore intersections of conceptions of environment and environmental justice, specifically how youth understand the connection between “environment” and belonging. Goals for this research project:
1-Gain an initial understanding of youth’s conceptions of environment
2-Have students document assets of their community environments
3-Explore how understanding environment as where humans live, work, play, and learn might increase a sense of belonging.

Watch my research presentation below.
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1194429@utah.edu

View my Presentation Slides HERE

 

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Poster #22: ADRIANA PAYAN-MEDINA – Characterization of Satellite-Derived Air Quality Measurements in Health Applications

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Faculty mentor: Ramkiran Gouripeddi

Generally, air pollution data is obtained from on-ground air pollution monitors. However, on-ground monitors limit available AQ data due to the lack of monitors. In this research project, we utilized NASA satellite data to compare its feasibility to obtain spatially and temporally accurate chemical pollution values. Through statistical analysis, satellite data was compared to on-ground air quality data. We mention the benefits and drawbacks of including satellite data in health research.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: aadrianapayann@gmail.com

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Poster #27: MADELINE TRIPP – Addressing Opioid Use in Carbon County, Utah

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Faculty mentor: Linda Edelman

My research focused on trying to understand opioid use in Carbon County, Utah. I conducted interviews with 9 community stakeholders that addressed existing barriers, ideas for improvement, resources that are already working, and perceived impact on the community. These stakeholders included healthcare professionals, government employees, and public health representatives, all individuals who have a unique connection with and perspective of opioid use in the county.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1048425@utah.edu

 

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Poster #31: LYNDSAY RICKS – Does the American cockroach’s personality affect its ability to form spatial learning associations?

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Faculty mentor: Donald Feener

In this project, I tested 34 American cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) for traits which are known to be consistent within individuals and vary between them (termed ‘personality’ traits by prior researchers) and examined how they were related and how they relate to the cockroach’s ability to learn, as well as whether research conducted on other cockroaches’ personalities could be extended to P. americana.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: lynn.ricks4@gmail.com

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Poster #29: ISABELLE GALLAND – The Phylogenetic Enigma of the Psychedelic Mushroom genus, Psilocybe

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Faculty mentor: Bryn Dentinger

This research project investigates the biological relationships between species in Fungi genus Psilocybe. The genetic database for Psilocybe, psilocybin-producing mushrooms, is lacking sufficient data due to only relying on a small fraction of known species for sequencing. This leads to discrepancies in the phylogeny.By contributing to this research, we will generate a comprehensive, species-level DNA barcode database for Psilocybe which will serve as a reference for future Psilocybe research.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1128468@utah.edu

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Poster #7: KITSEL LUSTED – Economic Extraction, Recovery, and Upgrading of Rare Earth Elements From Coal-Based Resources

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Faculty mentor: Michael Free

Rare earth elements have properties that make them useful in many applications. This project analyzed the application of biooxidation to the extraction of REEs from coal waste as a means of economically separating REEs from their constituents. Analysis of the recoveries showed that the primary element in the recovery was Yttrium (Y) at 22%, followed closely Cerium at 21% of total recovery.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: kitsellusted@gmail.com

 

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Film Performance #1: GABI SIU – Contemporary Design in the American West through the Lens of Film

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Faculty mentor: Anne Mooney

Artist’s Statement: Through my research, I have produced 9 short films focused on architecture and design in the American West specifically regarding works by architecture professor Anne Mooney. These films are in conjunction with the book “A Way of Working.” Each film’s connection to research and curation illuminate and further ground my work in partnership with my professor’s comprehension of the landscape of the project. Her work in the field significantly enriches the film’s narratives and further connects its conceptual underpinnings. The videos look at connections between architecture and elements of design work focused on the Bingham Canyon Mine, the immigrant experience of early miners and railroad workers in the region, and the role of extraction economies in the development of the West. The research and inclusion of material in the projects inject personal historical narratives into conversations around contemporary architectural practice. The films provide viewers the opportunity to construct new meaning surrounding the practices of architecture and design in the contemporary American West.

Watch my film below!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: gabi@siufamily.com

 

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Poster #30: BILLY NGUYEN – Elucidating the Molecular Mechanism of Action of the Microsclerodermins

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Faculty mentor: Aaron Puri

Methane-oxidizing bacterium Methylobacter tundripaludum makes a natural product that inhibits the growth of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.Genetic studies and analytical chemistry strongly suggest this compound is a microsclerodermin.Our results from the project show that yeast in log phase are much more susceptible to the compound than stationary phase cells. The result supports the hypothesis that the microsclerodermins have a specific molecular target worthy of further investigation

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: billynguyen9814@gmail.com

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Poster #20: VALERIE FERNANDEZ – Understanding the Incidence and Risk Factors Associated With Travelers’ Diarrhea

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Faculty mentor: Daniel Leung

The aim of this study is to determine the incidence and risk factors associated with travelers’ diarrhea. To do this, I analyzed data from post-travel surveys and completed bivariate and multivariable analysis. Factors with higher association to travelers’ diarrhea based on the multivariable analysis include travelers who visited SE Asia and/or Africa, went with a larger group, visited rural/countryside regions, had a longer trip duration, and used TD prevention medications/supplements.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: valerieferdls@gmail.com

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Poster #34: JAMIE GOETZ – Experimental Archaeology: Modeling the Costs of Groundstone tool-use for Maize Consumption in Range Creek Canyon, Utah

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Faculty mentor: Shannon Boomgarden

This experiment adds to the data set exploring how costly it was it to be a Fremont farmer in Range Creek Canyon, UT, and why they made the decisions they made? This research aids in understanding this question by gathering quantitative data (kcals/hour) on the cost of processing maize for consumption. In addition to the quantitative data, participants in actualistic experiments provide many observations about the process of grinding maize that ethnographic/archaeological records cannot provide.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1088885@utah.edu

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Poster #24: RILEY MURRAY – Bioavailable Strontium For Archaeological Studies In Modern Manhattan, New York

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Faculty mentor: Diego Fernandez

200 burials were uncovered in Manhattan’s Spring Street Cemetery. These individuals represent a diverse population, and offer a great opportunity for studying population migration. Our research uses strontium isotopes to distinguish between locals and migrants in Manhattan. We are particularly interested in a key question: can we use the Strontium 87/86 isotopic ratio as an elemental tracer to establish a local and nonlocal human population in a complex urban environment like modern Manhattan?

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: rileymurray1324@gmail.com

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Poster #2: VERONICA LUKASINSKI – Visualizing Gender-Based Violence Policy Data Collection for the State of Utah

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Faculty mentor: Annie Fukushima

This presentation introduces the still ongoing process of reviewing gender-based violence policies found in the state of Utah. The methodology is provided and preliminary findings are explored. Ultimately, this research will contribute to the “Visualizing Gender-Based Violence” project conceived by the University of Utah’s Gender-Based Violence Consortium, which will include resources to various social services, along with policy information.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0744845@utah.edu

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Poster #19: FATIMA FAIZI – Type 1 diabetes self-care: your daily dose of diabetes

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Faculty mentor: Man Hung

My research on the factors associated with type 1 diabetes was conducted online through pubmed. Diabetes is a disease that affects people across the lifespan, from childhood to adulthood, one can be diagnosed with diabetes at any age and at any time in their life. There are two types of diabetes type 1(T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D).This research is focused specifically on T1D. There are many factors that are associated with T1D such as sleep deprivation, high fructose corn syrup, and caffeine.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: fatima.n.faizi@gmail.com

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Poster #4: JIMENA MURILLO – Psychology and Intervention Use

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Faculty mentor: Zac Imel

The following research study analyzed the components of psychotherapy. The effectiveness of psychotherapy has been attributed to a combination of specific interventions, techniques, and common elements (common factors) that are widely used across different approaches in therapy (Wampold & Imel, 2015). We hypothesized that therapists who have a high rating of common factor items will utilize more specific non-CF interventions compared to therapists with low common factor ratings.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u1094899@umail.utah.edu

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Poster #38: JOSHUA URRY – The mediating role of coping behaviors in the relation between partner relationship quality and infant stress

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Faculty mentor: Robert Vlisides-Henry

This study examined the association between a mother’s partner relationship quality during pregnancy and her infant’s stress signs after birth and if the mother’s coping behaviors during pregnancy mediated this relation. It was found that partner relationship quality during pregnancy was not associated with infant stress signs and coping behaviors did not act as a mediator. However, coping behaviors did act as a mediator between partner relationship quality and depression.

Click below to hear me present my poster!
Questions or comments? Contact me at: u0974295@umail.utah.edu

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